Andrew R. Flores

  • Share Button

    Public Opinion of Transgender Rights in the US

    Winston Luhur, Taylor N.T. Brown, Andrew R. Flores
    August 2019

    Analysis finds that more Americans hold positive opinions toward transgender people than negative ones.

    Read more
  • Share Button

    Gender Identity Nondiscrimination Laws in Public Accommodations

    Amira Hasenbush, Andrew R. Flores, Jody L. Herman
    September 2018

    Massachusetts’ gender-identity inclusive public accommodations nondiscrimination laws do not negatively impact safety in public restrooms.

    Read more
  • Share Button

    Psychological Responses of Stigmatized Groups to Voter Referendums

    By Andrew R. Flores, Mark Hatzenbuehler, Gary Gates
    June 2018

    A study on the psychological effects of ballot measures related to same-sex marriage in 2012 found that LGBT people were more likely to be stressed as the total number of televised campaign advertisements increased.

    Read more
  • Share Button

    Greater Visibility Reduces Transphobia and Increases Support for Transgender Rights

    Andrew R. Flores, Donald P Haider-Markel, Daniel C. Lewis, Patrick R. Miller, Barry L. Tadlock, Jami K. Taylor
    May 2018

    A new study finds exposure to images and information about transgender people helps reduce transphobia, which increases an individual’s support for the equality and legal protection of transgender people.

    Read more
  • Share Button

    New Measures of LGBT Acceptance and Inclusion Worldwide

    Andrew R. Flores, Andrew Park, M.V. Lee Badgett
    April 2018

    A series of three studies use groundbreaking measures of LGBT acceptance and inclusion to examine the correlations between the economic, legal and social impact of LGBT inclusion worldwide.

    Read more
  • Share Button

    New Estimates Show that 150,000 Youth Ages 13 to 17 Identify as Transgender in the US

    Jody L. Herman, Andrew R. Flores, Taylor N. T. Brown, Bianca D.M. Wilson, and Kerith J. Conron, January 2017

    An estimated 0.7 percent of youth ages 13 to 17, or 150,000 youth, identify as transgender in the United States, according to a new study released by The Williams Institute at the UCLA School of Law. This study is the first to provide population estimates for youth who identify as transgender in each of the 50 states, plus the District of Columbia.

    The study provides new estimates of the age composition of individuals who identify as transgender in the U.S. and estimates of the size of the transgender-identified population by age group. The youngest age group, 13 to 17, has the highest estimated percentage of individuals who identify as transgender.

    Read more
  • Share Button

    Public Opinion on Transgender Rights: A Twenty-Three Country Survey

    Andrew R. Flores, Taylor N.T. Brown, and Andrew S. Park, December 2016

    Transgender rights have emerged as a central feature in the discourse on LGBT rights in many countries; however, little is known about public support for such rights around the globe. This report presents findings from a ground-breaking survey of 17,105 adults across 23 countries about their attitudes towards transgender people and rights.

    This study provides evidence of high levels of support for transgender rights, as well as instances of strong opposition.

    Read more
  • Share Button

    Adults Who Identify as Transgender are More Racially and Ethnically Diverse than the U.S. General Population

    Andrew R. Flores, Taylor N. T. Brown, and Jody L. Herman October 2016

    Adults who identify as transgender are more racially and ethnically diverse than the U.S. population overall, according to a new study released by The Williams Institute at the UCLA School of Law. This study is the first to provide estimates of the racial and ethnic make-up of adults who identify as transgender in each of the 50 states, plus the District of Columbia.

    Researchers estimate that adults who identify as transgender are less likely to be white and more likely to be racial and ethnic minorities when compared to the U.S. general population. Adults who identify as African-American or black, Latino or Hispanic, and adults of another race or ethnicity are more likely than white adults to identify as transgender.

    Read more
  • Share Button

    How Many Adults Identify as Transgender in the United States

    By Andrew R. Flores, Jody L. Herman, Gary J. Gates, and Taylor N. T. Brown
    June 2016

    Utilizing data from the 2014 Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System (BRFSS), which includes representative state-level surveys, Williams Institute scholars provide up-to-date estimates of the percentage and number of adults who identify as transgender in the United States. Approximately 0.6% of adults in the United States, or 1.4 million individuals, identify as transgender.

    The study also provides the first ever state-level estimates of the number and percentage of adults who identify as transgender for all 50 states and the District of Columbia. Differences exist in the percentage of adults who identify as transgender among the states, ranging from 0.3% in North Dakota to 0.8% in Hawaii. Differences by age also exist, with younger adults more likely to identify as transgender than older adults. An estimated 0.7% of adults ages 18 to 24, 0.6% of adults ages 25 to 64, and 0.5% of adults ages 65 and older identify as transgender.

    Read more
  • Share Button

    LGBT in the South

    By Christy Mallory, Andrew Flores and Brad Sears
    March 2016

    Christy Mallory, Andrew Flores and Brad Sears head to Asheville, North Carolina, to the LGBT in the South Conference to discuss the Williams Institute’s research on LGBT demographics and discrimination in the Southern states. Thirty-five percent of the LGBT population in the United States lives in the South, where they are more likely to lack employment protections, earn less than $24,000 a year, and report that they cannot afford food or healthcare.

    Read more
  • Share Button

    Backlash, Consensus, Legitimacy, or Polarization: The Effect of Same-Sex Marriage Policy on Mass Attitudes

    By Andrew R. Flores and Scott Barclay
    January 2016

    In the last 10 years, public support for marriage for same-sex couples has increased across the United States. But the most dramatic drop in anti-gay attitudes occurred in states that legalized marriage equality – in fact, 47% of residents who initially were opposed changed their minds. That’s almost double the percentage seen in states where marriage equality was not legal. In those states, 24% of residents who were initially opposed changed their minds. The findings are discussed in a report co-authored by Public Opinion and Policy Analyst Andrew R. Flores and published in Political Research Quarterly.

    Read more
  • Share Button

    Transgender inclusion in state non-discrimination policies: The democratic deficit and political powerlessness

    By Andrew Flores, Jody Herman and Christy Mallory
    December 2015

    We find that there is a substantial democratic deficit regarding the inclusion of gender identity or transgender in employment non-discrimination policies. On average, state support for the policy must be 81% in order for the state to have a policy reflecting such sentiment. This leaves substantial implications for the political powerlessness of transgender people in the political process.

    Read more
  • Share Button

    Attitudes toward Transgender Rights: Perceived Knowledge and Secondary Interpersonal Contact

    By Andrew R. Flores
    June 2015

    This study examines public attitudes about transgender rights in the USA. It finds that as respondents report being more informed about transgender people they tend to have more supportive attitudes. Interpersonal contact with someone who is lesbian or gay also leads to a secondary transfer of positive attitudes. About half of the secondary transfer effect operates through a mechanism of attitude generalization: contact positively affects the opinions people have on gay rights that then broaden to affect attitudes on transgender rights.

    Read more
  • Share Button

    Examining Variation in Surveying Attitudes on Same-Sex Marriage: A Meta-Analysis

    By Andrew Flores
    June 2015

    Most recent polls show that a majority of the U.S. supports legalizing marriage for same-sex couples. But some polls still report less than a majority in favor. Our public opinion and policy fellow Andrew Flores explored this variation and found that the difference is in how you frame it. Questions that focused on the issue of “same-sex marriage” garnered less support than questions on the legal recognition of marriages for same-sex couples. Even after accounting for this difference, the change in Americans’ attitudes on same-sex marriage is still large and significant.

    Read more
  • Share Button

    Making Transgender Count

    By Jody Herman, Andrew Flores, et al.
    February 2015

    The February 2015 edition of Transgender Studies Quarterly includes two articles co-authored by Williams Institute researchers. TSQ: Transgender Studies Quarterly offers a high-profile venue for innovative research and scholarship that contest the objectification, pathologization, and exoticization of transgender lives. It will publish interdisciplinary work that explores the diversity of gender, sex, sexuality, embodiment, and identity in ways that have not been adequately addressed by feminist and queer scholarship.

    Read more
  • Share Button

    Trends in Public Support for Marriage for Same-sex Couples by State: 2004-2014

    By Andrew R. Flores and Scott Barclay
    April 2015

    This research brief uses data from multiple national surveys and well-established statistical methods to estimate public opinion about marriages for same-sex couples for each state in the United States. Using this technique, we provide updated state level opinion estimates for 2014, highlight how popular opinion varies from state to state, and demonstrate how opinions have changed from 2004 to 2014. We finally turn to projecting statewide support estimates for 2016.

    Read more
  • Share Button

    Williams Institute Hosts Precedent-Setting Meeting on International Development

    Hundreds of international advocates, government officials and human development practitioners attended a day-long series of presentations and discussions in Washington, D.C. focusing on the role of sexual orientation and gender identity in international human and economic development.  This meeting featured experts from the World Bank, the United Nations, representatives from some of the major donor …

    Read more
  • Share Button

    The LGBT Divide: A Data Portrait of LGBT People in the Midwestern, Mountain & Southern States

    By Amira Hasenbush, Andrew R. Flores, Angeliki Kastanis, Brad Sears, Gary J. Gates
    December 2014

    By Amira Hasenbush, Andrew R. Flores, Angeliki Kastanis, Brad Sears, Gary J. Gates December 2014 LGBT Americans in the 29 states without state laws that prohibit discrimination on the basis of sexual orientation consistently see greater disparities than in the 21 states with such laws, including less social acceptance, greater economic vulnerability, especially among African-American …

    Read more
  • Share Button

    LGB Vote 2014

    By Andrew R. Flores, Gary J. Gates
    December 2014

    By Andrew Flores, Gary J. Gates December 2014 Exit polls from the 2014 midterm election suggest that 4% of the electorate identified as lesbian, gay, or bisexual, representing the highest recorded LGB turnout in a midterm election since 1998. These LGB voters, 75% in fact, overwhelmingly supported Democratic candidates in key congressional races. If LGB people …

    Read more
  • Share Button

    National Trends in Public Opinion on LGBT Rights in the United States

    By Andrew Flores
    November 2014

    This report analyzes over 325 national public opinion surveys dating back to June 1977 that ask the public their opinions on LGBT rights. The report finds that national trends indicate a rapid and significant increase over the last three decades in public support for the rights of lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender people in the United States. On average, public support for marriage equality has more than doubled since the early 2000s.

    Read more