International

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    Updated Yogyakarta Principles Released

    Andrew Park

    International human rights experts have released a supplement to the groundbreaking Yogyakarta Principles, a universal guide to human rights related to sexual orientation, gender identity, gender expression and sex characteristics which apply to all United Nations member states.

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    Public Opinion on Transgender Rights: Poland

    Taylor N. T. Brown
    November 2017

    Using data from a nationally-representative sample, this report documents public opinion of transgender people and their rights in Poland and provides detailed findings of the characteristics that may affect these attitudes.

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    Indonesian Economy Hurt by Discrimination Against LGBT People

    M.V. Lee Badgett, Amira Hasenbush, Winston Ekaprasetia Luhur, March 2017

    Discrimination against lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender (LGBT) Indonesians in workplaces, schools, and social opportunities is pervasive and will limit their ability to fully contribute to the Indonesian economy. A new study shows that the cost of discrimination to the Indonesian economy could range from nearly 900 million to 12 billion US dollars.

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    Exploring International Priorities & Best Practices for Collecting Data on Gender Minorities

    Taylor N.T Brown, Jody L. Herman, Andrew Park, March 2017

    On June 17th, 2016, researchers at the Williams Institute, along with a steering committee of advisers, convened an international meeting of experts in Amsterdam. The purpose was to consider the current lack of international standards for collecting data about gender minorities in official, large-scale surveys.

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    Proposed Revisions to the Yogyakarta Principles

    Andrew Park
    February 2017

    Three proposals for additional principles to be added to the Yogyakarta Principles have been submitted to ARC International. Since their issuance in 2007, the Yogyakarta Principles have been the primary document defining the application of international human rights law with respect to sexual orientation and gender identity. They were developed by a group of international …

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    Population-Based Study Shows No Difference in Outcomes Among Children Raised by Same-Sex and Different-Sex Parent Families in the Netherlands

    Henny M.W. Bos, PhD, University of Amsterdam, Nanette K. Gartrell, MD, Lisette Kuyer, PhD, February 2017

    A new study found that there was no difference in child outcomes among Dutch same-sex and different-sex parent families. Based upon a nationally representative sample from the Netherlands, the study compared same-sex and different-sex parent households on children’s psychological well-being, parenting stress, and the parents’ use of informal and formal support in child rearing.

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    Public Opinion on Transgender Rights: A Twenty-Three Country Survey

    Andrew R. Flores, Taylor N.T. Brown, and Andrew S. Park, December 2016

    Transgender rights have emerged as a central feature in the discourse on LGBT rights in many countries; however, little is known about public support for such rights around the globe. This report presents findings from a ground-breaking survey of 17,105 adults across 23 countries about their attitudes towards transgender people and rights.

    This study provides evidence of high levels of support for transgender rights, as well as instances of strong opposition.

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    A Development Agenda for Sexual and Gender Minorities

    By Andrew Park, Esq.
    July 2016

    This paper sets out the theoretical framework for formulating an international development agenda for sexual and gender minorities. The audience for this paper includes researchers, development practitioners, human rights advocates and those in the LGBT community interested in the growing field of human and economic development.

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    Declaration of Ilan H. Meyer, in the case of Sexual Minorities Uganda v. Lively

    By Ilan H. Meyer
    May 2016

    By Ilan H. Meyer May 2016 Ilan Meyer, Williams Distinguished Senior Scholar of Public Policy, has submitted an expert report to a United Stated Federal Court in the case of Sexual Minorities Uganda v. Lively. In that case, a group of Ugandans have brought a lawsuit against evangelist Scott Lively for his role in conspiring …

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    Development and Human Rights: Two Complementary Frameworks

    By Andrew Park and M.V. Lee Badgett
    May 2016

    This article examines the differences and overlaps between the human rights and human development frameworks, and argues that both frameworks offer related, but separate, perspectives on public policy impacting LGBT people. The annual report, titled State-Sponsored Homophobia: A World Survey of Sexual Orientation Laws: Criminalisation, Protection and Recognition, is issued each year in connection with IDAHOT.

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    Does an Improved Social Environment for Sexual and Gender Minorities Have Implications for a New Minority Stress Research Agenda?

    By Ilan Meyer
    May 2016

    In this essay, Dr. Meyer notes changes in social attitudes in many countries that allow LGBT people in those countries to experience a more accepting and inclusive society. He argues that these changes compel researchers to assess the impacts of the changes on the lived experiences of LGBT people, including reducing health disparities between LGBT people and the general population, and across demographic categories – age, gender and gender expression, race/ethnicity, and socioeconomic. At the same time, Dr. Meyer reminds us that these changes are not global, and that in many parts of the United States and the world LGBT people continue to experience stigma and prejudice that lead to discrimination and violence against them.

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    Reachable: Data collection methods for sexual orientation and gender identity

    By Andrew Park
    March 17, 2016

    Sexual and gender minorities have often been classified as “hard-to-reach” populations, particularly in middle and low income countries. However, recent developments in data collection methods demonstrate the increasing number of tools available to those seeking to understand the lived realities of sexual and gender minorities in many areas of the globe. Reachable highlight examples of measurements of sexual orientation and gender identity, and provides a brief number of examples of their use around the world, particularly in the areas of health, education and employment.

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    The Price of Exclusion: A Research Guide

    By Andrew Park
    December 2015

    This research guide includes bibliographic references to research about the impact of discrimination against LGBT people, including poverty, lost productivity, homelessness, depression and suicide. The guide accompanies the United Nations video titled “The Price of Exclusion,” narrated by Zachery Quinto. The UN released the video to commemorate the anniversary of the signing of the United Nations Declaration on Human Rights. This guide provides references and summaries of the research underlying the data cited in the video, and also includes other selected research findings.

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    Colombian Constitutional Court Relies on Social Science Studies in Decision Allowing Same-sex Couples to Adopt

    The Colombian Constitutional Court ruled on November 4, 2015, that same-sex couples in Colombia can adopt children. Williams Institute scholars Abbie Goldberg, Nanette Gartrell, and Gary Gates filed a brief with the Court that reviewed social science research on psychological, emotional and educational outcomes of children of same-sex parents

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    Commentary: United States Has an Obligation to Collect Data about LGBT Discrimination

    By Andrew Park
    September 2015

    This report examines the obligation of the United States to monitor discrimination and stigma against LGBT people in the United States, particularly through the use of a national human rights institution. The report concludes that the failure to establish such monitoring mechanisms results in lost opportunities for policymakers to understand the lived reality of LGBT people.

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    Williams Institute Scholar Testifies at Constitutional Court of Colombia

    By Nan Hunter
    July 2015

    On July 30, Prof. Nan Hunter, Associate Dean at Georgetown Law and Williams Institute Distinguished Scholar, testified at the Constitutional Court in Bogota, Columbia. An expert on matrimonial law, Hunter was invited to testify at a hearing to decide whether to extend equal marriage rights to same-sex couples.

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    United Nations Human Rights Council Recommends the United States Establish a National Human Rights Body

    By Andrew Park
    May 2015

    On May 15, 2015, the Human Rights Council of the United Nations issued a draft report with a series of recommendations to the United States government to rectify human rights violations. Every four years, the United Nations Human Rights Council (UNHRC) reviews the human rights record of each country. The review of the U.S. began last fall and involved many months of data collection by the U.N. and testimony by hundreds of participants.

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    Lee Badgett speaks to Irish community ahead of referendum

    M.V. Lee Badgett, Williams Distinguished Scholar, presented her research about marriage to an Irish audience on March 19, 2015 at a conference in Dublin, Ireland. On May 22, 2015, voters in Ireland will decide whether to approve a referendum amending Ireland’s constitution to permit same-sex marriage. If the measure is passed, Ireland will become the world’s first country to adopt marriage equality by a popular vote.

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    Making Transgender Count

    By Jody Herman, Andrew Flores, et al.
    February 2015

    The February 2015 edition of Transgender Studies Quarterly includes two articles co-authored by Williams Institute researchers. TSQ: Transgender Studies Quarterly offers a high-profile venue for innovative research and scholarship that contest the objectification, pathologization, and exoticization of transgender lives. It will publish interdisciplinary work that explores the diversity of gender, sex, sexuality, embodiment, and identity in ways that have not been adequately addressed by feminist and queer scholarship.

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    Williams Institute Provides Research to United Nations Countries

    Andrew Park
    April 2015

    Williams Institute International Program Director Andrew Park provided legal analysis and research to 14 countries on the United Nations Human Rights Council: Argentina, Bolivia, Brazil, Cuba, Mexico, Paraguay, Japan, Republic of Korea, France, Germany, Ireland and the Netherlands regarding the human rights situation in the United States. In April 2015, the UN Human Rights Council will review the human situation in the United States. That review, to take place at the United Nations, will include questions about legal protections available to LGBT people in the United States.

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