Health & HIV/AIDS

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    LGBT Access to Prescription Medications

    Brad Sears, Kerith J. Conron
    December 2018

    LGBT people in California are more likely to delay getting the prescription medicines they need or to go without them entirely.

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    HIV Criminalization in Florida

    Amira Hasenbush
    October 2018

    A new report finds some disparities in the enforcement of HIV criminal laws in Florida, based on race, sex, geography and related offenses.

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    HIV Testing and PrEP Use in Different Generations of Gay and Bisexual Men

    Phillip L. Hammack , Ilan H. Meyer, Evan A. Krueger, Marguerita Lightfoot, David M. Frost
    September 2018

    Only 25% of young sexually active gay and bisexual men have never been tested for HIV and just 4% of all gay and bisexual men use PrEP.

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    Health and Well-being of Aging LGB Adults in California

    Soon Kyu Choi, Krystal Kittle, Ilan H. Meyer
    August 2018

    LGB older adults in California are as healthy as their straight counterparts. However, among LGB bisexuals and LGB Hispanics exhibit health disparities.

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    Psychological Responses of Stigmatized Groups to Voter Referendums

    By Andrew R. Flores, Mark Hatzenbuehler, Gary Gates
    June 2018

    A study on the psychological effects of ballot measures related to same-sex marriage in 2012 found that LGBT people were more likely to be stressed as the total number of televised campaign advertisements increased.

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    The Impact of Medicaid Expansion in Virginia on Uninsured LGBT Adults

    Shoshana Goldberg, Kerith Conron
    June 2018

    Up to 21,000 uninsured LGBT adults, ages 18-64, could gain access to health insurance under Virginia’s recent Medicaid expansion.

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    Conversion Therapy and LGBT Youth

    Christy Mallory, Taylor N.T. Brown, Kerith J. Conron
    January 2018

    The first estimates on LGBT youth at risk of conversion therapy find that 20,000 teens ages 13 to 17 will receive the treatment from a healthcare professional before they turn 18. Also, approximately 57,000 will undergo conversion therapy by a religious or spiritual advisor.

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    LGBT Adults with Medicaid Insurance

    Kerith Conron, Shoshana Goldberg
    January 2018

    An estimated 1,171,000 LGBT adults ages 18-64 years old have Medicaid as their primary source of health insurance. While the majority of LGBT adults with Medicaid are employed, an estimated 542,000 may be at risk of losing coverage due to work or community service requirements that states may impose under guidance released on January 11, 2018 by the US Department of Health and Human Services.

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    HIV Criminalization in Georgia

    Amira Hasenbush
    January 2018

    Georgia laws that criminalize people living with HIV have resulted in 571 arrests from 1988 to September 2017. Preliminary analyses show some disparities in enforcement of the laws based on race, sex, geography, and underlying related offenses.

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    Characteristics and Mental Health of Gender Nonconforming Adolescents in California

    Bianca D.M. Wilson, Soon Kyu Choi, Jody Herman, Tara Becker, Kerith Conron
    December 2017

    A new report provides the first look at data collected from the California Health Interview Survey, which for the first time measured gender expression and mental health indicators among California’s youth population.

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    Demographics and Health of California’s Transgender Adults

    Jody Herman, Bianca D.M. Wilson, Tara Becker
    October 2017

    A new report provides the first look at transgender data from the California Health Interview Survey (CHIS), the nation’s largest state survey. The report reveals demographic characteristics of transgender adults in the state, such as population size, racial makeup and marital status, as well as disparities in their health status.

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    HIV Criminalization and Sex Work in California

    Amira Hasenbush, Bianca D.M. Wilson, Ayako Miyashita, Madeline Sharp
    October 2017

    The vast majority of all HIV-specific criminal incidents in California involve people engaged in sex work or those suspected of engaging in sex work. A new report finds that women—and Black women, in particular—are the most disproportionately impacted by California’s sex work laws, both as they apply to people living with HIV and people not living with HIV.

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    Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, and Transgender (LGBT) Health Services in the United States: Origins, Evolution, and Contemporary Landscape

    Alexander J. Martos, Patrick A. Wilson, Ilan H. Meyer
    July 2017

    LGBT community health centers have been a major provider of health services to LGBT people in the U.S., but there are significant gaps in the types of services offered by centers across the country. This study identified 213 LGBT community health centers operating in 37 states. Most LGBT community health centers provide wellness programs and services (72 percent), HIV/STI services (65 percent), and counseling services (52 percent). Among the services least available across health centers are transgender care services (10 percent), pharmacy services (8%), and psychiatric services (3%).

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    Criminalización del VIH Contra Inmigrantes en California

    Amira Hasenbush, Bianca D.M. Wilson, mayo de 2017

    Una traducción nueva de un informe que fue publicado en el otoño de 2016 indica que para unos inmigrantes, un delito penal relacionado con el VIH podria haber sido un evento que ocasionó procesos de deportación. En el informe Criminalización del VIH Contra Inmigrantes en California, investigadoras del Instituto Williams, Amira Hasenbush y Bianca D.M. Wilson, utilizaron los datos de la Información del Registro de Antecedentes Penales de California para explorer cómo las leyes penales sobre el VIH en California se aplican contra los residentes nacidos en el extranjero.

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    World AIDS Day Report – HIV Criminalization in California: Evaluation of Transmission Risk

    Amira Hasenbush and Dr. Brian Zanoni, December 2016

    In California, outdated HIV criminalization laws do not reflect the highly effective medical advances for reducing the risk of HIV transmission and extending the quantity and quality of life for people living with HIV.

    HIV criminalization is a term used to describe laws that either criminalize otherwise legal conduct or that increase the penalties for illegal conduct based upon a person’s HIV-positive status. California has four HIV-specific criminal laws.

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    For Immigrants, HIV Criminalization Can Mean Incarceration and Deportation

    Amira Hasenbush, Bianca D.M. Wilson, October 2016

    In the new report HIV Criminalization Against Immigrants in California, Williams Institute Scholars Amira Hasenbush and Bianca D.M. Wilson, use California Criminal Offender Record Information (CORI) data to explore how HIV criminal laws in California are enforced against foreign born populations.

    Key Findings include: 15 percent of people in California who have come into contact with the criminal justice system for HIV crimes are foreign born and 83 percent of those foreign born were from Mexico, Central or South America, or the Caribbean.

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    Missed the Blood Equality Panel at the Hammer Museum? We Have It Videotaped.

    Blood Equality November 22, 2016 7:30pm Co-presented by the Hammer Museum WATCH VIDEO PRESENTATION In advance of December 1st, World AIDS Day, this  panel examined the FDA’s ban on blood donations from gay and bisexual men, which currently requires celibacy for one year before donating.* Panelists included Brad Sears, Associate Dean and Executive Director of the Williams Institute …

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    LGBT Aging: A Review of Research Findings, Needs, and Policy Implications

    By Soon Kyu Choi, Ilan H. Meyer
    August 2016

    In LGBT Aging: A Review of Research Findings, Needs, and Policy Implications, Soon Kyu Choi and Ilan H. Meyer, Ph.D. provide a review of what is known about lesbian, gay, bisexual or transgender (LGBT) older adults.

    “It is estimated that 2.4 million LGBT older adults over 50 live in the United States,” Ilan H Meyer, Ph.D., Williams Distinguished Senior Scholar of Public Policy, says. “That number is expected to double by 2030. The needs of older LGBT adults are quite different than those of the non-LGBT population. LGBT older adults are sometimes apprehensive of how they’ll be treated by healthcare providers or in senior care facilities. We need to ensure that LGBT seniors will receive sensitive and effective care wherever they go for care.”

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    Food Insecurity and SNAP Participation in the LGBT Community

    By Taylor N.T. Brown, Adam P. Romero, and Gary J. Gates
    July 2016

    This study analyzes the extent of food insecurity experiences and participation in the federal Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP) among LGBT adults and adults in same-sex couples. Using data from four representative, population-based surveys the authors find higher rates of these experiences among LGBT adults and adults in same-sex couples than among non-LGBT adults and adults in different-sex couples.

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    The Legal Needs of Cisgender Women Living with HIV: Evaluating Access to Justice in Los Angeles

    By Amira Hasenbush, Ayako Miyashita, and Brad Sears
    July 2016

    This report summarizes findings of the Legal Assessment of Needs Study (“LeAN Study”) – an online survey with 387 respondents who identified as people living with HIV/AIDS – for cisgender women living with HIV in Los Angeles County. We describe respondents’ legal needs, respondents’ experiences getting assistance for identified legal needs from both legal and non-legal sources, and barriers respondents faced in accessing assistance from both legal and non-legal sources. We describe differences and similarities between transgender women and all other respondents. Finally, we discuss how these legal needs may relate to health access and health status.

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