Economic Impact Reports

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    Estimating the Economic Boost of Marriage for Same-Sex Couples in North Dakota

    By Justin O'Neill, Christy Mallory, M.V. Lee Badgett
    October 2014

    Extending marriage to same-sex couples in North Dakota would generate an estimated $1.9 million in spending to the state economy. According to the 2010 U.S. Census, the most recent data available, 559 same-sex couples live in North Dakota. Of those couples, the Institute estimates that fifty percent (280 couples) would choose to marry in the first three years, a pattern that has been observed in Massachusetts and elsewhere. The marriages that would occur in the first year alone would bring about $1.2 million in revenue to the state of North Dakota that year.

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    Estimating the Economic Boost of Marriage for Same-Sex Couples in South Dakota

    By Justin O'Neill, Christy Mallory, M.V. Lee Badgett
    October 2014

    Extending marriage to same-sex couples in South Dakota would generate an estimated $2.4 million in spending to the state economy. According to the 2010 U.S. Census, the most recent data available, 714 same-sex couples live in South Dakota. Of those couples, the Institute estimates that fifty percent (357 couples) would choose to marry in the first three years, a pattern that has been observed in Massachusetts and elsewhere. The marriages that would occur in the first year alone would bring about $1.5 million in revenue to the state of South Dakota that year.

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    Estimating the Economic Boost of Marriage for Same-Sex Couples in Montana

    By Justin O'Neill, Christy Mallory, M.V. Lee Badgett
    October 2014

    Extending marriage to same-sex couples in Montana would generate an estimated $4.5 million in spending to the state economy. According to the 2010 U.S. Census, the most recent data available, 1,348 same-sex couples live in Montana. Of those couples, the Institute estimates that fifty percent (674 couples) would choose to marry in the first three years, a pattern that has been observed in Massachusetts and elsewhere. The marriages that would occur in the first year alone would bring about $2.9 million in revenue to the state of Montana that year.

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    Estimating the Economic Boost of Marriage for Same-Sex Couples In Idaho

    By Justin O'Neill, Christy Mallory, M.V. Lee Badgett
    October 2014

    Extending marriage to same-sex couples in Idaho would generate an estimated $6.8 million in spending to the state economy. According to the 2010 U.S. Census, the most recent data available, 2,042 same-sex couples live in Idaho. Of those couples, the Institute estimates that fifty percent (1,021 couples) would choose to marry in the first three years, a pattern that has been observed in Massachusetts and elsewhere. The marriages that would occur in the first year alone would bring nearly $4.4 million in revenue to the state of Idaho that year.

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    Estimating the Economic Boost of Marriage for Same-Sex Couples in South Carolina

    By Justin O'Neill, Christy Mallory, M.V. Lee Badgett
    October 2014

    Extending marriage to same-sex couples in South Carolina would generate an estimated $25.2 million in spending to the state economy. According to the 2010 U.S. Census, the most recent data available, 7,214 same-sex couples live in South Carolina. Of those couples, the Institute estimates that fifty percent (3,607 couples) would choose to marry in the first three years, a pattern that has been observed in Massachusetts and elsewhere. The marriages that would occur in the first year alone would bring about $16 million in revenue to the state of South Carolina that year.

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    Estimating the Economic Boost of Marriage for Same-Sex Couples in North Carolina

    By Justin O'Neill, Christy Mallory, M.V. Lee Badgett
    October 2014

    Extending marriage to same-sex couples in North Carolina would generate an estimated $64.4 million in spending to the state economy. According to the 2010 U.S. Census, the most recent data available, 18,309 same-sex couples live in North Carolina. Of those couples, the Institute estimates that fifty percent (9,155 couples) would choose to marry in the first three years, a pattern that has been observed in Massachusetts and elsewhere. The marriages that would occur in the first year alone would bring about $41.2 million in revenue to the state of North Carolina that year.

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    Estimating the Economic Boost of Marriage for Same-Sex Couples in Alaska

    By Justin O'Neill, Christy Mallory, M.V. Lee Badgett
    October 2014

    Extending marriage to same-sex couples in Alaska would generate an estimated $8 million in spending to the state economy. According to the 2010 U.S. Census, the most recent data available, 1,228 same-sex couples live in Alaska. Of those couples, the Institute estimates that fifty percent (614 couples) would choose to marry in the first three years. The marriages that would occur in the first year alone would bring over $5.1 million in revenue to the state of Alaska that year.

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    Estimating the Economic Boost of Marriage for Same-Sex Couples in West Virginia

    By Justin M. O’Neill, Christy Mallory, M.V. Lee Badgett
    October 2014

    Extending marriage to same-sex couples in West Virginia would generate an estimated $9 million in spending to the state economy. According to the 2010 U.S. Census, 2,848 same-sex couples live in West Virginia. Of those couples, it is estimated that 50 percent, or 1,424 couples, would choose to marry in the first three years, a pattern that has been observed in Massachusetts and elsewhere. Over 911 marriages would occur in the first year alone, and bring over $5.8 million in revenue to the state of West Virginia that year.

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    Estimating the Economic Boost of Marriage for Same-Sex Couples in Wyoming

    By Justin M. O’Neill, Christy Mallory, M.V. Lee Badgett
    September 2014

    Extending marriage to same-sex couples in Wyoming would generate an estimated $2.4 million in spending to the state economy. According to the 2010 U.S. Census, 657 same-sex couples live in Wyoming. Of those couples, it is estimated that 50 percent, or 329 couples, would choose to marry in the first three years, a pattern that has been observed in Massachusetts and elsewhere. Over 211 marriages would occur in the first year alone, and bring over $1.6 million in revenue to the state of Wyoming that year.

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    Estimating the Economic Boost of Marriage for Same-Sex Couples in Missouri

    By Justin O'Neill, Christy Mallory, M.V. Lee Badgett
    September 2014

    Extending marriage to same-sex couples in Missouri would generate an estimated $36.3 million in spending to the state economy. According to the 2010 U.S. Census, the most recent data available, 10,557 same-sex couples live in Missouri. Of those couples, the Institute estimates that fifty percent (5,279couples) would choose to marry in the first three years, a pattern that has been observed in Massachusetts and elsewhere. The marriages that would occur in the first year alone would bring over $23.2 million in revenue to the state of Missouri that year.

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    Estimating the Economic Boost of Marriage for Same-Sex Couples in Georgia

    By Justin O'Neill, Christy Mallory, M.V. Lee Badgett
    August 2014

    Extending marriage to same-sex couples in Georgia would generate an estimated $78.8 million in spending to the state economy. According to the 2010 U.S. Census, the most recent data available, 21,318 same-sex couples live in Georgia. Of those couples, the Institute estimates that fifty percent (10,659 couples) would choose to marry in the first three years, a pattern that has been observed in Massachusetts and elsewhere. The marriages that would occur in the first year alone would bring over $50.4 million in revenue to the state of Georgia that year.

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    Estimating the Economic Boost of Marriage for Same-Sex Couples in Oklahoma

    By E.G. Fitzgerald, Christy Mallory, M.V. Lee Badgett
    August 2014

    Extending marriage to same-sex couples in Oklahoma would generate an estimated $20.5 million in spending to the state economy. According to the 2010 U.S. Census, the most recent data available, 6,134 same-sex couples live in Oklahoma. Of those couples, the Institute estimates that fifty percent (3,067 couples) would choose to marry in the first three years, a pattern that has been observed in Massachusetts and elsewhere. The marriages that would occur in the first year alone would bring over $13.1 million in revenue to the state of Oklahoma that year.

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    Estimating the Economic Boost of Marriage for Same-Sex Couples in Florida

    By E.G. Fitzgerald, Christy Mallory, M.V. Lee Badgett
    August 2014

    Extending marriage to same-sex couples in Florida would generate an estimated $182.2 million in spending to the state economy. According to the 2010 U.S. Census, the most recent data available, 48,496 same-sex couples live in Florida. Of those couples, the Institute estimates that 50 percent (24,248 couples) would choose to marry in the first three years, a pattern that has been observed in Massachusetts and elsewhere. The marriages that would occur in the first year alone would bring over $116 million in revenue to the state of Florida that year.

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    Estimating the Economic Boost of Marriage for Same-Sex Couples in Tennessee

    By Justin O'Neill, Christy Mallory, M.V. Lee Badgett
    August 2014

    Extending marriage to same-sex couples in Tennessee would generate an estimated $36.7 million in spending to the state economy. According to the 2010 U.S. Census, the most recent data available, 10,898 same-sex couples live in Tennessee. Of those couples, the Institute estimates that fifty percent (5,449 couples) would choose to marry in the first three years, a pattern that has been observed in Massachusetts and elsewhere. The marriages that would occur in the first year alone would bring over $23.5 million in revenue to the state of Tennessee that year.

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    Estimating the Economic Boost of Marriage for Same-Sex Couples in Kentucky

    By Justin O'Neill, Christy Mallory, M.V. Lee Badgett
    August 2014

    Extending marriage to same-sex couples in Kentucky would generate an estimated $23.4 million in spending to the state economy. According to the 2010 U.S. Census, the most recent data available, 7,195 same-sex couples live in Kentucky. Of those couples, the Institute estimates that fifty percent (3,598 couples) would choose to marry in the first three years, a pattern that has been observed in Massachusetts and elsewhere. The marriages that would occur in the first year alone would bring over $15.0 million in revenue to the state of Kentucky that year.

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    Estimating the Economic Boost of Marriage for Same-Sex Couples in Ohio

    By Justin O'Neill, Christy Mallory, M.V. Lee Badgett
    August 2014

    Extending marriage to same-sex couples in Ohio would generate an estimated $70.8 million in spending to the state economy. According to the 2010 U.S. Census, the most recent data available, 19,684 same-sex couples live in Ohio. Of those couples, the Institute estimates that fifty percent (9,842 couples) would choose to marry in the first three years, a pattern that has been observed in Massachusetts and elsewhere. The marriages that would occur in the first year alone would bring over $45.3 million in revenue to the state of Ohio that year.

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    Estimating the Economic Boost of Marriage for Same-Sex Couples in Michigan

    By Justin O'Neill, Christy Mallory, M.V. Lee Badgett
    August 2014

    Extending marriage to same-sex couples in Michigan would generate an estimated $53.2 million in spending to the state economy. According to the 2010 U.S. Census, the most recent data available, 14,598 same-sex couples live in Michigan. Of those couples, the Institute estimates that fifty percent (7,299 couples) would choose to marry in the first three years, a pattern that has been observed in Massachusetts and elsewhere. The marriages that would occur in the first year alone would bring over $34.1 million in revenue to the state of Michigan that year.

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    Estimating the Economic Boost of Marriage for Same-Sex Couples in Texas

    By E.G. Fitzgerald, Christy Mallory, M.V. Lee Badgett
    July 2014

    Extending marriage to same-sex couples in Texas would generate an estimated $181.6 million in spending to the state economy. According to the 2010 U.S. Census, the most recent data available, 46,401 same-sex couples live in Texas. Of those couples, the Institute estimates that 50 percent (23,200 couples) would choose to marry in the first three years. Over 14,848 marriages would occur in the first year alone, and bring up to $116 million in revenue to the state of Texas that year.

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    Estimating the Economic Boost of Extending Marriage to Same-Sex Couples in Nevada

    By M.V. Lee Badgett, Christy Mallory
    June 2014

    Extending marriage to same-sex couples in Nevada would generate an additional $23 million to $53 million in spending to the state. According to 2010 U.S. Census, the state of Nevada has about 7,140 resident in same-sex relationships. Of those couples, 50 percent or 3,570 couples would chose to marry within the first 3 years, a pattern that has been witnessed in other states. As a result, about 2,300 marriages would occur in this first year alone; adding an additional $14 to $34 million in revenue to the state that year.

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    Estimating the Economic Boost of Marriage for Same-Sex Couples in Arizona

    By E.G. Fitzgerald, Christy Mallory, M.V. Lee Badgett
    June 2014

    Extending marriage to same-sex couples in Arizona would generate an estimated $61.9 million in spending to the state economy. This economic boost would add $5.1 million in sales tax revenue to the state coffer and spending related to same-sex couples’ wedding ceremonies and celebrations could generate up to 517 full- and part-time jobs in the state. According to 2010 U.S. Census data, 15,817 same-sex couples live in Arizona. Of those couples, an estimated 50 percent or 7,909 couples would choose to marry in the first three years.

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