Research

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    HIV Criminalization and Sex Work in California

    Amira Hasenbush, Bianca D.M. Wilson, Ayako Miyashita, Madeline Sharp
    October 2017

    The vast majority of all HIV-specific criminal incidents in California involve people engaged in sex work or those suspected of engaging in sex work. A new report finds that women—and Black women, in particular—are the most disproportionately impacted by California’s sex work laws, both as they apply to people living with HIV and people not living with HIV.

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    LGBTQ Youth in Public Schools: Differences Across the State

    Soon Kyu Choi, Bianca D.M. Wilson
    October 2017

    LGBTQ youth in California experience less connection to their school, poorer academic outcomes and more frequent victimization than their non-LGBTQ peers. A new report by the Williams Institute explored disparities in school experiences, school performance and well-being of LGBTQ and non-LGBTQ youth in California, as well as disparities between LGBTQ youth in rural and urban areas in the state.

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    Discrimination Based on Sexual Orientation and Gender Identity in Montana

    Christy Mallory, Brad Sears
    September 2017

    Approximately 22,300 LGBT people in Montana are not explicitly protected from discrimination under state law. Adding sexual orientation and gender identity to the state’s existing employment non-discrimination law would not be costly or burdensome for the state to enforce.

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    Discrimination Based on Sexual Orientation and Gender Identity in Idaho

    Christy Mallory, Brad Sears
    September 2017

    Approximately 31,800 LGBT people in Idaho are not explicitly protected from discrimination under state law. Adding sexual orientation and gender identity to the state’s existing employment non-discrimination law would not be costly or burdensome for the state to enforce.

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    Discrimination Based on Sexual Orientation and Gender Identity in Wyoming

    Christy Mallory, Brad Sears
    September 2017

    Approximately 15,100 LGBT people in Wyoming are not explicitly protected from discrimination under state law. Adding sexual orientation and gender identity to the state’s existing employment non-discrimination laws would not be costly or burdensome for the state to enforce.

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    Employment Discrimination Based on Sexual Orientation and Gender Identity in Nebraska

    Christy Mallory, Brad Sears
    August 2017

    Approximately 34,800 LGBT workers in Nebraska are not explicitly protected from discrimination under state law. Adding sexual orientation and gender identity to the state’s existing employment non-discrimination law would not be costly or burdensome for the state to enforce.

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    Employment Discrimination Based on Sexual Orientation and Gender Identity in Indiana

    Christy Mallory, Brad Sears
    August 2017

    Approximately 133,000 LGBT workers in Indiana are not explicitly protected from discrimination under state law. Adding sexual orientation and gender identity to the state’s existing employment non-discrimination laws would not be costly or burdensome for the state to enforce.

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    Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, and Transgender (LGBT) Health Services in the United States: Origins, Evolution, and Contemporary Landscape

    Alexander J. Martos, Patrick A. Wilson, Ilan H. Meyer
    July 2017

    LGBT community health centers have been a major provider of health services to LGBT people in the U.S., but there are significant gaps in the types of services offered by centers across the country. This study identified 213 LGBT community health centers operating in 37 states. Most LGBT community health centers provide wellness programs and services (72 percent), HIV/STI services (65 percent), and counseling services (52 percent). Among the services least available across health centers are transgender care services (10 percent), pharmacy services (8%), and psychiatric services (3%).

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    Scholars File Amici Brief in Transgender Veterans Case

    June 2017

    On June 28, 2017, Williams Institute and other scholars who study the transgender population submitted an amici brief to the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Federal Circuit in Fulcher v. Secretary of Veterans Affairs. In their amici brief, the scholars present social science data and scholarly research regarding the transgender population establishing that transgender status should be considered a suspect classification for purposes of Constitutional equal-protection analysis.

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    Estimates of Marriages of Same-Sex Couples at the Two-Year Anniversary of Obergefell v. Hodges

    Adam P. Romero
    June 2017

    Over 150,000 same-sex couples have married since the U.S. Supreme Court extended marriage equality nationwide. In total, over 1.1 million LGBT adults are currently married to a same-sex partner.

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    Demographic Characteristics and Health Status of Transgender Adults in Select US Regions: Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System, 2014

    Dr. Ilan H. Meyer with Taylor N.T. Brown and Dr. Jody L. Herman, the Williams Institute; Dr. Sari L. Reisner, Harvard Medical School and Boston Children’s Hospital; Dr. Walter O. Bockting, Columbia University Medical Center, May 2017

    Transgender adults in the U.S. are more likely than cisgender adults to report poor health and lack of health insurance coverage. The study is the first to analyze health data from the Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System, a nationally representative survey that includes questions to identify transgender individuals in 19 states and one U.S. territory.

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    Criminalización del VIH Contra Inmigrantes en California

    Amira Hasenbush, Bianca D.M. Wilson, mayo de 2017

    Una traducción nueva de un informe que fue publicado en el otoño de 2016 indica que para unos inmigrantes, un delito penal relacionado con el VIH podria haber sido un evento que ocasionó procesos de deportación. En el informe Criminalización del VIH Contra Inmigrantes en California, investigadoras del Instituto Williams, Amira Hasenbush y Bianca D.M. Wilson, utilizaron los datos de la Información del Registro de Antecedentes Penales de California para explorer cómo las leyes penales sobre el VIH en California se aplican contra los residentes nacidos en el extranjero.

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    Legacies and Lessons – Sexual Violence Against Men and Boys in Sri Lanka and Bosnia & Herzegovina

    All Survivors Project, May 2017

    Evidence shows that most known incidents of sexual violence against men and boys in both Bosnia & Herzegovina and Sri Lanka took place in detention settings. In both places stigma and shame, along with other factors, remain powerful deterrents to reporting. A combination of an inadequate and complex legal framework, coupled with the lack of expertise in responding to sexual violence against men and boys, have prevented survivors from reporting these violations and accessing justice.

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    The Impact of Stigma and Discrimination against LGBT People in Texas

    by Christy Mallory, Taylor N.T. Brown, Stephen Russell & Brad Sears, April 2017

    Texas’s legal landscape and social climate contribute to an environment in which LGBT people are at risk of experiencing stigma and harassment. Stigma and discrimination can lead to economic instability and poorer health for LGBT people. These individual-level outcomes, in turn, can negatively impact the state, businesses, and the economy in a number of ways.

    The study documents the prevalence and impact on LGBT people of several forms of stigma and discrimination, including harassment and discrimination in employment, housing, and public accommodations; harassment and bullying in schools; and family rejection. The study also discusses the economic implications of such discrimination.

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    LGBQ Youth Disproportionately Incarcerated in the U.S. Juvenile Justice System 

    Bianca D.M. Wilson, Ph.D., Sid P. Jordan, J.D., Ilan H. Meyer, Ph.D., Andrew R. Flores, Ph.D., Lara Stemple, J.D., and Jody L. Herman, Ph.D., April 2017

    Researchers consider the extent to which sexual minority youth are disproportionately incarcerated in the U.S. juvenile detention system and whether sexual minority youth are incarcerated for longer periods than heterosexual youth. The study also considers the prevalence of sexual victimization while in custody for sexual minority youth compared to their heterosexual peers of the same gender. Sexual minority youth include those that identify as lesbian, gay, or bisexual, as well as those that identified as mostly straight but had some attraction to the same sex.

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    Indonesian Economy Hurt by Discrimination Against LGBT People

    M.V. Lee Badgett, Amira Hasenbush, Winston Ekaprasetia Luhur, March 2017

    Discrimination against lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender (LGBT) Indonesians in workplaces, schools, and social opportunities is pervasive and will limit their ability to fully contribute to the Indonesian economy. A new study shows that the cost of discrimination to the Indonesian economy could range from nearly 900 million to 12 billion US dollars.

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    Exploring International Priorities & Best Practices for Collecting Data on Gender Minorities

    Taylor N.T Brown, Jody L. Herman, Andrew Park, March 2017

    On June 17th, 2016, researchers at the Williams Institute, along with a steering committee of advisers, convened an international meeting of experts in Amsterdam. The purpose was to consider the current lack of international standards for collecting data about gender minorities in official, large-scale surveys.

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    Scholars File Amici Brief in Gloucester County School Board v. GG

    On March 2, 2017, sixty scholars who study the transgender population–many of whom are affiliated with the Williams Institute–filed an amici curiae brief with the U.S. Supreme Court in Gloucester County School Board v. GG. The case concerns a transgender student’s access to school facilities consistent with his gender identity.

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    Proposed Revisions to the Yogyakarta Principles

    Andrew Park
    February 2017

    Three proposals for additional principles to be added to the Yogyakarta Principles have been submitted to ARC International. Since their issuance in 2007, the Yogyakarta Principles have been the primary document defining the application of international human rights law with respect to sexual orientation and gender identity. They were developed by a group of international …

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    Population-Based Study Shows No Difference in Outcomes Among Children Raised by Same-Sex and Different-Sex Parent Families in the Netherlands

    Henny M.W. Bos, PhD, University of Amsterdam, Nanette K. Gartrell, MD, Lisette Kuyer, PhD, February 2017

    A new study found that there was no difference in child outcomes among Dutch same-sex and different-sex parent families. Based upon a nationally representative sample from the Netherlands, the study compared same-sex and different-sex parent households on children’s psychological well-being, parenting stress, and the parents’ use of informal and formal support in child rearing.

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