Experts

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    Kerith Conron

    Dr. Kerith Conron is the Blachford-Cooper Distinguished Scholar and Research Director. She is a social and psychiatric epidemiologist whose work focuses on documenting and reducing health inequities that impact sexual and gender minority (LGBTQ) populations. Dr. Conron is committed to altering the landscape of adversity and opportunity for the most marginalized LGBTQ communities through collaborative …

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    The Impact of Stigma and Discrimination against LGBT People in Texas

    by Christy Mallory, Taylor N.T. Brown, Stephen Russell & Brad Sears, April 2017

    Texas’s legal landscape and social climate contribute to an environment in which LGBT people are at risk of experiencing stigma and harassment. Stigma and discrimination can lead to economic instability and poorer health for LGBT people. These individual-level outcomes, in turn, can negatively impact the state, businesses, and the economy in a number of ways.

    The study documents the prevalence and impact on LGBT people of several forms of stigma and discrimination, including harassment and discrimination in employment, housing, and public accommodations; harassment and bullying in schools; and family rejection. The study also discusses the economic implications of such discrimination.

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    770,000 LGBT Adults and 158,500 LGBT Youth in Texas Vulnerable to Stigma and Discrimination

    Texas is home to an estimated 770,000 LGBT adults and 158,500 LGBT youth. The study documents the prevalence and impact of several forms of stigma and discrimination against LGBT individuals in the state, including harassment and discrimination in employment, housing, and public accommodations; harassment and bullying in schools; and family rejection.

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    LGBQ Youth Disproportionately Incarcerated in the U.S. Juvenile Justice System 

    Bianca D.M. Wilson, Ph.D., Sid P. Jordan, J.D., Ilan H. Meyer, Ph.D., Andrew R. Flores, Ph.D., Lara Stemple, J.D., and Jody L. Herman, Ph.D., April 2017

    Researchers consider the extent to which sexual minority youth are disproportionately incarcerated in the U.S. juvenile detention system and whether sexual minority youth are incarcerated for longer periods than heterosexual youth. The study also considers the prevalence of sexual victimization while in custody for sexual minority youth compared to their heterosexual peers of the same gender. Sexual minority youth include those that identify as lesbian, gay, or bisexual, as well as those that identified as mostly straight but had some attraction to the same sex.

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    Indonesian Economy Hurt by Discrimination Against LGBT People

    M.V. Lee Badgett, Amira Hasenbush, Winston Ekaprasetia Luhur, March 2017

    Discrimination against lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender (LGBT) Indonesians in workplaces, schools, and social opportunities is pervasive and will limit their ability to fully contribute to the Indonesian economy. A new study shows that the cost of discrimination to the Indonesian economy could range from nearly 900 million to 12 billion US dollars.

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    Scholars File Amici Brief in Gloucester County School Board v. GG

    On March 2, 2017, sixty scholars who study the transgender population–many of whom are affiliated with the Williams Institute–filed an amici curiae brief with the U.S. Supreme Court in Gloucester County School Board v. GG. The case concerns a transgender student’s access to school facilities consistent with his gender identity.

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    Scholars File Amici Brief on Same-Sex Marriage Case in Texas

    In their amici brief, the Williams Institute scholars provide the Texas Supreme Court with data on same-sex couples and their families in Texas and the United States, to provide the Court with a fuller picture of those who will be most directly impacted by the Court’s decision. Among other findings and research discussed in the brief, the data show that there are an estimated 83,000 same-sex couples all across Texas, and that approximately 35,000 of these couples were married as of 2015.

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    Population-Based Study Shows No Difference in Outcomes Among Children Raised by Same-Sex and Different-Sex Parent Families in the Netherlands

    Henny M.W. Bos, PhD, University of Amsterdam, Nanette K. Gartrell, MD, Lisette Kuyer, PhD, February 2017

    A new study found that there was no difference in child outcomes among Dutch same-sex and different-sex parent families. Based upon a nationally representative sample from the Netherlands, the study compared same-sex and different-sex parent households on children’s psychological well-being, parenting stress, and the parents’ use of informal and formal support in child rearing.

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    73,400 LGBT Workers in Alabama Vulnerable to Ongoing Employment Discrimination

    Christy Mallory and Brad Sears

    Approximately 73,400 LGBT workers in Alabama are vulnerable to employment discrimination absent explicit statewide legal protections, while 71 Percent of Alabama Residents Support Legal Protections for LGBT Workers.

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    There are Over 75,000 LGBT DREAMers; 36,000 Have Participated in DACA

    Kerith Conron and Taylor N.T. Brown, February 2017

    The Williams Institute estimates that there are over 75,000 LGBT DREAMers in the U.S. and over 36,000 have participated in Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals (DACA), including 24,000 who renewed in the program. DACA allowed undocumented immigrants who entered the United States before the age of 16, and met other requirements, temporary work authorization and protection from deportation for a renewable two-year period.

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    94,700 LGBT Workers in Tennessee Lack Statewide Protections Against Ongoing Employment Discrimination

    Christy Mallory and Brad Sears, February 2017

    Adding sexual orientation and gender identity to the state’s existing non-discrimination law would protect these workers, and would not be costly or burdensome for the state to enforce.

    Approximately 94,700 LGBT workers in Tennessee are vulnerable to employment discrimination absent explicit statewide legal protections.

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    New Fact Sheet on California’s HIV Criminalization Laws

    Senator Scott Wiener (D-San Francisco) and Assemblymember Todd Gloria (D-San Diego) introduced Senate Bill 239, a bill to modernize laws that criminalize people living with HIV. Assemblymember David Chiu is also a co-author of the bill. It would amend California’s HIV criminalization laws, enacted in the 1980s and 1990s at a time of fear and ignorance about HIV and its transmission, to make them up to date with the current understanding of HIV prevention, treatment, and transmission.

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    Incarceration Rate of LGB People Three Times the General Population

    Ilan H. Meyer, PhD, Andrew R. Flores, PhD, Lara Stemple, JD, Adam P. Romero, JD, Bianca D.M. Wilson, PhD, and Jody L. Herman, PhD., February 2017

    A new study by scholars at the Williams Institute found that sexual minorities are incarcerated at disproportionately high rates, and once incarcerated they are more likely to experience mistreatment, harsh punishment, and sexual victimization. Approximately 238,000 sexual minorities are incarcerated in the United States. The nationwide incarceration rate of sexual minorities was previously unknown.

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    Scholars File Amici Brief On Transgender Youth

    On January 30, 2017, 62 scholars who study the transgender population–many of whom are affiliated with the Williams Institute–filed an amici curiae brief with the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Seventh Circuit in Whitaker v. Kenosha School District.  The appeal concerns a transgender student’s access to facilities consistent with his gender identity.  In their …

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    Stigma and Discrimination Against LGBT People in Georgia Negatively Impact 300,000 LGBT Adults and 58,200 LGBT Youth in the State

    Christy Mallory, Brad Sears, Eric R. Wright & Kerith Conron, January 2017

    Georgia’s unsupportive legal landscape and social climate contribute to an environment in which LGBT people are at risk of discrimination and harassment, with costs estimated in the hundreds of millions.

    This study estimated costs related to discrimination against LGBT people in employment and other settings; to bullying and family rejection of LGBT youth; and to health disparities resulting from a challenging climate for LGBT people. The study drew upon state-level data to estimate some of the cost savings that would result if Georgia were to move towards creating a more accepting environment for its 300,000 LGBT adults and 58,200 LGBT youth.

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    Nancy Polikoff, Visiting Scholar

    Nancy Polikoff is a Williams Institute Visiting Scholar, Professor of Law at American University Washington College of Law and Visiting Professor of Law at UCLA Law School. At the American University Washington College of Law, she teaches Family Law and a seminar on Children of LGBT Parents. From Fall 2011 through Fall 2012, she was the Visiting …

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    New Estimates Show that 150,000 Youth Ages 13 to 17 Identify as Transgender in the US

    Jody L. Herman, Andrew R. Flores, Taylor N. T. Brown, Bianca D.M. Wilson, and Kerith J. Conron, January 2017

    An estimated 0.7 percent of youth ages 13 to 17, or 150,000 youth, identify as transgender in the United States, according to a new study released by The Williams Institute at the UCLA School of Law. This study is the first to provide population estimates for youth who identify as transgender in each of the 50 states, plus the District of Columbia.

    The study provides new estimates of the age composition of individuals who identify as transgender in the U.S. and estimates of the size of the transgender-identified population by age group. The youngest age group, 13 to 17, has the highest estimated percentage of individuals who identify as transgender.

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    Public Opinion on Transgender Rights: A Twenty-Three Country Survey

    Andrew R. Flores, Taylor N.T. Brown, and Andrew S. Park, December 2016

    Transgender rights have emerged as a central feature in the discourse on LGBT rights in many countries; however, little is known about public support for such rights around the globe. This report presents findings from a ground-breaking survey of 17,105 adults across 23 countries about their attitudes towards transgender people and rights.

    This study provides evidence of high levels of support for transgender rights, as well as instances of strong opposition.

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    Scholars File Amici Brief On Constitutionality of Mississippi Statute

    On December 22, 2016, 82 scholars who study the LGBT population–many of whom are affiliated with the Williams Institute–filed an amici curiae brief with the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Fifth Circuit in Barber v. Bryant and Campaign for Southern Equality v. Bryant. These appeals concern the constitutionality of Mississippi’s House Bill 1523, which elevates three anti-LGBT religious beliefs …

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    World AIDS Day Report – HIV Criminalization in California: Evaluation of Transmission Risk

    Amira Hasenbush and Dr. Brian Zanoni, December 2016

    In California, outdated HIV criminalization laws do not reflect the highly effective medical advances for reducing the risk of HIV transmission and extending the quantity and quality of life for people living with HIV.

    HIV criminalization is a term used to describe laws that either criminalize otherwise legal conduct or that increase the penalties for illegal conduct based upon a person’s HIV-positive status. California has four HIV-specific criminal laws.

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    Surveying LGBTQ Youth in Foster Care: Lessons from Los Angeles 

    Bianca D.M. Wilson, Khush Cooper, Angel Kastanis, and Soon Kyu Choi, November 2016

    This report describes the methodology used in a 2014 Williams Institute study on sexual and gender minority youth in the Los Angeles County foster care system . The 2014 study surveyed youth in foster care about their sexual orientation, gender identity and gender expression, other demographic characteristics, and experiences in foster care. In this methods report about the 2014 study, researchers describe the study design and process, share their survey instrument and recommended questions, and review lessons learned from their experience.

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