Amira Hasenbush

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    HIV Criminalization in Florida

    Amira Hasenbush
    October 2018

    A new report finds some disparities in the enforcement of HIV criminal laws in Florida, based on race, sex, geography and related offenses.

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    Gender Identity Nondiscrimination Laws in Public Accommodations

    Amira Hasenbush, Andrew R. Flores, Jody L. Herman
    September 2018

    Massachusetts’ gender-identity inclusive public accommodations nondiscrimination laws do not negatively impact safety in public restrooms.

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    Indonesian Economy Hurt by Discrimination Against LGBT People

    M.V. Lee Badgett, Amira Hasenbush, Winston Ekaprasetia Luhur, March 2017

    Discrimination against lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender (LGBT) Indonesians in workplaces, schools, and social opportunities is pervasive and will limit their ability to fully contribute to the Indonesian economy. A new study shows that the cost of discrimination to the Indonesian economy could range from nearly 900 million to 12 billion US dollars.

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    New Fact Sheet on California’s HIV Criminalization Laws

    Senator Scott Wiener (D-San Francisco) and Assemblymember Todd Gloria (D-San Diego) introduced Senate Bill 239, a bill to modernize laws that criminalize people living with HIV. Assemblymember David Chiu is also a co-author of the bill. It would amend California’s HIV criminalization laws, enacted in the 1980s and 1990s at a time of fear and ignorance about HIV and its transmission, to make them up to date with the current understanding of HIV prevention, treatment, and transmission.

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    World AIDS Day Report – HIV Criminalization in California: Evaluation of Transmission Risk

    Amira Hasenbush and Dr. Brian Zanoni, December 2016

    In California, outdated HIV criminalization laws do not reflect the highly effective medical advances for reducing the risk of HIV transmission and extending the quantity and quality of life for people living with HIV.

    HIV criminalization is a term used to describe laws that either criminalize otherwise legal conduct or that increase the penalties for illegal conduct based upon a person’s HIV-positive status. California has four HIV-specific criminal laws.

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    For Immigrants, HIV Criminalization Can Mean Incarceration and Deportation

    Amira Hasenbush, Bianca D.M. Wilson, October 2016

    In the new report HIV Criminalization Against Immigrants in California, Williams Institute Scholars Amira Hasenbush and Bianca D.M. Wilson, use California Criminal Offender Record Information (CORI) data to explore how HIV criminal laws in California are enforced against foreign born populations.

    Key Findings include: 15 percent of people in California who have come into contact with the criminal justice system for HIV crimes are foreign born and 83 percent of those foreign born were from Mexico, Central or South America, or the Caribbean.

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    The Legal Needs of Cisgender Women Living with HIV: Evaluating Access to Justice in Los Angeles

    By Amira Hasenbush, Ayako Miyashita, and Brad Sears
    July 2016

    This report summarizes findings of the Legal Assessment of Needs Study (“LeAN Study”) – an online survey with 387 respondents who identified as people living with HIV/AIDS – for cisgender women living with HIV in Los Angeles County. We describe respondents’ legal needs, respondents’ experiences getting assistance for identified legal needs from both legal and non-legal sources, and barriers respondents faced in accessing assistance from both legal and non-legal sources. We describe differences and similarities between transgender women and all other respondents. Finally, we discuss how these legal needs may relate to health access and health status.

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    The Fiscal Impact of Washington State Initiative Measure 1515

    By Amira Hasenbush, Christy Mallory, and Brad Sears
    May 2016

    A ballot initiative in Washington State that would restrict access to restrooms based on biological sex would impact an estimated 26,400 transgender people in the state, and could put at risk up to $4.5 billion in annual federal funding to schools and other state and local government entities. The initiative is in conflict with the gender identity non-discrimination requirements under several federal laws including Title IX of the Education Amendments of 1972, Executive Order 13672, Workforce Innovation and Opportunity Act, the Violence Against Women Act, the Affordable Care Act, Title VII of the Civil Rights Act of 1964, and the Housing Act of 1949. Federal agencies that enforce the laws are authorized to suspend or terminate funding if recipients violate the non-discrimination requirements.

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    Washington State Ballot Initiative Restricting Restroom Access Would Put $4.5 Billion in Federal Funding At Risk

    A ballot initiative in Washington, Initiative Measure 1515, would require public schools to restrict access to restrooms and other shared facilities based on biological sex, and may require similar restrictions in all state and local government buildings. The initiative would put at risk up to $1 billion annually in federal funding to schools, and may put at risk an additional $3.5 billion annually in funding to state and local government entities, according to a new analysis conducted by the Williams Institute.

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    Meeting the Legal Needs of People Living with HIV: Effort, Impact, and Emerging Trends

    By Ayako Miyashita and Amira Hasenbush
    April 2016

    This report analyzes archival client services data from fourteen legal services providers dedicated to serving people living with HIV (“PLWH”) in the ten Metropolitan Statistical Areas with the largest number of HIV-positive residents. Those areas included New York, Miami, Los Angeles, Washington, D.C., Chicago, Philadelphia, San Francisco, Atlanta, Houston, and Dallas. This report includes data from 2010 through 2012 on legal needs addressed by each agency, eligibility criteria, funding, client demographics, target populations, and emerging trends in practice.

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    HIV service providers support many legal needs despite few resources, new study shows

    Even with limited resources, HIV legal services providers continue to meet a broad set of legal needs in the metropolitan areas with the largest numbers of people living with HIV, according to a new study by researchers at the Williams Institute at UCLA School of Law. Nevertheless, providers still frequently turn away clients or refer them elsewhere when they are unable to meet certain legal needs, particularly in criminal law matters.

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    HIV Criminalization in California: Penal Implications for People Living with HIV/AIDS

    By Amira Hasenbush, Ayako Miyashita, and Bianca D.M. Wilson
    December 2015 – Updated June 2016

    Given the lack of comprehensive data on the use of HIV criminal laws in California, Williams Institute researchers obtained criminal offender record information (CORI) data from the California Department of Justice. CORI data record any contacts an individual may have with the criminal justice system, from every event beginning at arrest through sentencing, so these data provide a full chronological record of how four state laws that criminalize people living with HIV are being utilized from the time of their enactment to June 2014.

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    The Legal Needs of Transgender Women Living with HIV: Evaluating Access to Justice in Los Angeles

    By Ayako Miyashita, Amira Hasenbush, and Brad Sears
    November 2015

    This report summarizes findings of the Legal Assessment of Needs Study (“LeAN Study”) – an online survey with 387 respondents who identified as people living with HIV/AIDS – for transgender women living with HIV in Los Angeles County. We describe respondents’ legal needs, respondents’ experiences getting assistance for identified legal needs from both legal and non-legal sources, and barriers respondents faced in accessing assistance from both legal and non-legal sources. We describe differences and similarities between transgender women and all other respondents. Finally, we discuss how these legal needs may relate to health access and health status.

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    The Legal Needs of People Living with HIV: Evaluating Access to Justice in Los Angeles

    By Ayako Miyashita, Amira Hasenbush, Bianca D.M. Wilson, Ilan Meyer, Sheila Nezhad, Brad Sears
    April 2015

    This report summarizes findings of the Legal Assessment of Needs Study (“LeAN Study”) – an online survey with 387 respondents who identified as people living with HIV/AIDS (“PLWH”). We describe respondents’ legal needs, respondents’ experiences getting assistance for identified legal needs from both legal and non-legal sources, and barriers respondents faced in accessing assistance from both legal and non-legal sources. We describe differences and similarities among subpopulations that are traditionally underserved and understudied, including gay and bisexual men (“GBM”), people of color, and cisgender and transgender women. Finally, we discuss how these legal needs may relate to health access and health status.

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