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    Scholars File Amici Brief in Transgender Veterans Case

    June 2017

    On June 28, 2017, Williams Institute and other scholars who study the transgender population submitted an amici brief to the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Federal Circuit in Fulcher v. Secretary of Veterans Affairs. In their amici brief, the scholars present social science data and scholarly research regarding the transgender population establishing that transgender status should be considered a suspect classification for purposes of Constitutional equal-protection analysis.

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    Estimates of Marriages of Same-Sex Couples at the Two-Year Anniversary of Obergefell v. Hodges

    Adam P. Romero
    June 2017

    Over 150,000 same-sex couples have married since the U.S. Supreme Court extended marriage equality nationwide. In total, over 1.1 million LGBT adults are currently married to a same-sex partner.

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    Unmet Public Health Needs Among Transgender People in the U.S. Include Poor General Health and Lack of Access to Health Care

    A new study by scholars at the Williams Institute found that compared with cisgender (i.e., non-transgender) individuals, transgender individuals had higher prevalence of poor general health and they had more days per month of poor physical and mental health. More transgender than cisgender people lacked health care coverage, a health care provider, and dental care.

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    Para los Inmigrantes, la Criminalización del VIH Puede Resultar en Encarcelamiento y Deportación

    La criminalización del VIH es un término utilizado para describir los estatutos que criminalizan una conducta legal o que aumentan las penalizaciones por una conducta ilegal en base al estado de VIH positivo de una persona. California tiene cuatro leyes penales específicas sobre el VIH, y una ley penal no específicamente sobre el VIH que criminaliza la exposición a cualquier enfermedad transmisible. Todos los delitos relacionados con el VIH en California tienen el potencial de conducir a procesos de deportación.

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    Legacies and Lessons – Sexual Violence Against Men and Boys in Sri Lanka and Bosnia & Herzegovina

    All Survivors Project, May 2017

    Evidence shows that most known incidents of sexual violence against men and boys in both Bosnia & Herzegovina and Sri Lanka took place in detention settings. In both places stigma and shame, along with other factors, remain powerful deterrents to reporting. A combination of an inadequate and complex legal framework, coupled with the lack of expertise in responding to sexual violence against men and boys, have prevented survivors from reporting these violations and accessing justice.

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    Media Advisory: Trump Administration to Reconsider Healthcare Protections for Transgender People

    Transgender Individuals Face Substantial Health Disparities and Discrimination that Federal Regulations Aim to Reduce.

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    Media Advisory: Federal Executive Order Providing Religious Exemptions Would Allow Discrimination Against LGBT People

    A federal executive order carving out broad religious exemptions to existing laws and policies could provide sweeping protections for employers, service providers, and others that discriminate against LGBT people.

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    Media Advisory: The House Health Care Bill Would Have a Negative Impact on LGBT People

    LGBT people are also disproportionately more likely to have pre-existing conditions—like mental health conditions or HIV/AIDS—and could be charged more based on health status; lose access to needed health services altogether; or exceed annual or lifetime caps.

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    Jocelyn Samuels Selected as Next Executive Director of the Williams Institute

    The UCLA School of Law announced today that Jocelyn Samuels has been selected as the next Executive Director of the Williams Institute, a think tank within the law school that conducts research on sexual orientation and gender identity law and public policy. She will join the Williams Institute on June 5 and become Executive Director on July 1.

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    The Impact of Stigma and Discrimination against LGBT People in Texas

    by Christy Mallory, Taylor N.T. Brown, Stephen Russell & Brad Sears, April 2017

    Texas’s legal landscape and social climate contribute to an environment in which LGBT people are at risk of experiencing stigma and harassment. Stigma and discrimination can lead to economic instability and poorer health for LGBT people. These individual-level outcomes, in turn, can negatively impact the state, businesses, and the economy in a number of ways.

    The study documents the prevalence and impact on LGBT people of several forms of stigma and discrimination, including harassment and discrimination in employment, housing, and public accommodations; harassment and bullying in schools; and family rejection. The study also discusses the economic implications of such discrimination.

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    LGBQ Youth Disproportionately Incarcerated in the U.S. Juvenile Justice System 

    Bianca D.M. Wilson, Ph.D., Sid P. Jordan, J.D., Ilan H. Meyer, Ph.D., Andrew R. Flores, Ph.D., Lara Stemple, J.D., and Jody L. Herman, Ph.D., April 2017

    Researchers consider the extent to which sexual minority youth are disproportionately incarcerated in the U.S. juvenile detention system and whether sexual minority youth are incarcerated for longer periods than heterosexual youth. The study also considers the prevalence of sexual victimization while in custody for sexual minority youth compared to their heterosexual peers of the same gender. Sexual minority youth include those that identify as lesbian, gay, or bisexual, as well as those that identified as mostly straight but had some attraction to the same sex.

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    Media Advisory: Federal Government Rolls Back Important Data Collection on LGBT Populations

    On March 28, 2017, the Trump Administration removed “sexual orientation” and “gender identity” as proposed subjects for possible inclusion on the Decennial Census and/or American Community Survey in the future. “Given another recent move to take such questions off a federal survey and administrative form, there appears to be a new policy or practice to exclude sexual orientation and gender identity measures from federal data collection efforts,” said Adam Romero, Federal Policy Director at the Williams Institute. “Without federal data on LGBT populations, the ability of federal, state, and local governments to make evidence-based public policy that also reflects the experiences and needs of LGBT Americans is significantly undermined.

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    Indonesian Economy Hurt by Discrimination Against LGBT People

    M.V. Lee Badgett, Amira Hasenbush, Winston Ekaprasetia Luhur, March 2017

    Discrimination against lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender (LGBT) Indonesians in workplaces, schools, and social opportunities is pervasive and will limit their ability to fully contribute to the Indonesian economy. A new study shows that the cost of discrimination to the Indonesian economy could range from nearly 900 million to 12 billion US dollars.

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    Nearly a Million LGBT Adults May Lose Health Insurance by 2026 Due to Proposed Changes to the Affordable Care Act

    The Congressional Budget Office (CBO) estimates that changes recently proposed by Republicans, referred to as the American Health Care Act, would lead to higher uninsurance rates in the U.S. as a whole. Based on the CBO’s estimates, we estimate that more than a half million LGBT adults would be uninsured in 2018 under the proposed changes to the ACA. By 2020, the number of uninsured LGBT adults would increase by more than three-quarters of a million, and by 2026 would rise by nearly a million.

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    Media Advisory: Trump Administration Proposes to End Important Data Collection on LGBT Elders and People with Disabilities

    The National Survey of Older American Act Participants is an annual survey conducted by ACL that provides critical feedback on programs funded by Title III of the Older Americans Act, including meal programs and transportation services. Prior versions of this survey included a question on sexual orientation—among other personal demographic characteristics—but ACL is now proposing to remove only the sexual orientation question and has not explained its reason for doing so.

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    Exploring International Priorities & Best Practices for Collecting Data on Gender Minorities

    Taylor N.T Brown, Jody L. Herman, Andrew Park, March 2017

    On June 17th, 2016, researchers at the Williams Institute, along with a steering committee of advisers, convened an international meeting of experts in Amsterdam. The purpose was to consider the current lack of international standards for collecting data about gender minorities in official, large-scale surveys.

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    Scholars File Amici Brief in Gloucester County School Board v. GG

    On March 2, 2017, sixty scholars who study the transgender population–many of whom are affiliated with the Williams Institute–filed an amici curiae brief with the U.S. Supreme Court in Gloucester County School Board v. GG. The case concerns a transgender student’s access to school facilities consistent with his gender identity.

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    Scholars File Amici Brief on Same-Sex Marriage Case in Texas

    In their amici brief, the Williams Institute scholars provide the Texas Supreme Court with data on same-sex couples and their families in Texas and the United States, to provide the Court with a fuller picture of those who will be most directly impacted by the Court’s decision. Among other findings and research discussed in the brief, the data show that there are an estimated 83,000 same-sex couples all across Texas, and that approximately 35,000 of these couples were married as of 2015.

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    Population-Based Study Shows No Difference in Outcomes Among Children Raised by Same-Sex and Different-Sex Parent Families in the Netherlands

    Henny M.W. Bos, PhD, University of Amsterdam, Nanette K. Gartrell, MD, Lisette Kuyer, PhD, February 2017

    A new study found that there was no difference in child outcomes among Dutch same-sex and different-sex parent families. Based upon a nationally representative sample from the Netherlands, the study compared same-sex and different-sex parent households on children’s psychological well-being, parenting stress, and the parents’ use of informal and formal support in child rearing.

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    Media Advisory: Fact Sheet on Guidance Protecting Over 350,000 Transgender Youth and Young Adults From Discrimination

    News outlets are reporting that the U.S. Departments of Education and Justice will withdraw legal guidance that protects over 350,000 transgender youth and young adults in the United States from discrimination in education. The Williams Institute is providing this fact sheet to assist with reporting on the issue. Williams Institute scholars are available for comment.

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