Marriage & Couples Rights

  • GA-Census-Map

    Estimating the Economic Boost of Marriage for Same-Sex Couples in Georgia

    By Justin O'Neill, Christy Mallory, M.V. Lee Badgett
    August 2014

    Extending marriage to same-sex couples in Georgia would generate an estimated $78.8 million in spending to the state economy. According to the 2010 U.S. Census, the most recent data available, 21,318 same-sex couples live in Georgia. Of those couples, the Institute estimates that fifty percent (10,659 couples) would choose to marry in the first three years, a pattern that has been observed in Massachusetts and elsewhere. The marriages that would occur in the first year alone would bring over $50.4 million in revenue to the state of Georgia that year.

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  • OK-Census-Map

    Estimating the Economic Boost of Marriage for Same-Sex Couples in Oklahoma

    By E.G. Fitzgerald, Christy Mallory, M.V. Lee Badgett
    August 2014

    Extending marriage to same-sex couples in Oklahoma would generate an estimated $20.5 million in spending to the state economy. According to the 2010 U.S. Census, the most recent data available, 6,134 same-sex couples live in Oklahoma. Of those couples, the Institute estimates that fifty percent (3,067 couples) would choose to marry in the first three years, a pattern that has been observed in Massachusetts and elsewhere. The marriages that would occur in the first year alone would bring over $13.1 million in revenue to the state of Oklahoma that year.

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  • Estimating the Economic Boost of Marriage for Same-Sex Couples in Florida

    By E.G. Fitzgerald, Christy Mallory, M.V. Lee Badgett
    August 2014

    Extending marriage to same-sex couples in Florida would generate an estimated $182.2 million in spending to the state economy. According to the 2010 U.S. Census, the most recent data available, 48,496 same-sex couples live in Florida. Of those couples, the Institute estimates that 50 percent (24,248 couples) would choose to marry in the first three years, a pattern that has been observed in Massachusetts and elsewhere. The marriages that would occur in the first year alone would bring over $116 million in revenue to the state of Florida that year.

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  • Estimating the Economic Boost of Marriage for Same-Sex Couples in Tennessee

    By Justin O'Neill, Christy Mallory, M.V. Lee Badgett
    August 2014

    Extending marriage to same-sex couples in Tennessee would generate an estimated $36.7 million in spending to the state economy. According to the 2010 U.S. Census, the most recent data available, 10,898 same-sex couples live in Tennessee. Of those couples, the Institute estimates that fifty percent (5,449 couples) would choose to marry in the first three years, a pattern that has been observed in Massachusetts and elsewhere. The marriages that would occur in the first year alone would bring over $23.5 million in revenue to the state of Tennessee that year.

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  • Estimating the Economic Boost of Marriage for Same-Sex Couples in Kentucky

    By Justin O'Neill, Christy Mallory, M.V. Lee Badgett
    August 2014

    Extending marriage to same-sex couples in Kentucky would generate an estimated $23.4 million in spending to the state economy. According to the 2010 U.S. Census, the most recent data available, 7,195 same-sex couples live in Kentucky. Of those couples, the Institute estimates that fifty percent (3,598 couples) would choose to marry in the first three years, a pattern that has been observed in Massachusetts and elsewhere. The marriages that would occur in the first year alone would bring over $15.0 million in revenue to the state of Kentucky that year.

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  • Estimating the Economic Boost of Marriage for Same-Sex Couples in Ohio

    By Justin O'Neill, Christy Mallory, M.V. Lee Badgett
    August 2014

    Extending marriage to same-sex couples in Ohio would generate an estimated $70.8 million in spending to the state economy. According to the 2010 U.S. Census, the most recent data available, 19,684 same-sex couples live in Ohio. Of those couples, the Institute estimates that fifty percent (9,842 couples) would choose to marry in the first three years, a pattern that has been observed in Massachusetts and elsewhere. The marriages that would occur in the first year alone would bring over $45.3 million in revenue to the state of Ohio that year.

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  • Estimating the Economic Boost of Marriage for Same-Sex Couples in Michigan

    By Justin O'Neill, Christy Mallory, M.V. Lee Badgett
    August 2014

    Extending marriage to same-sex couples in Michigan would generate an estimated $53.2 million in spending to the state economy. According to the 2010 U.S. Census, the most recent data available, 14,598 same-sex couples live in Michigan. Of those couples, the Institute estimates that fifty percent (7,299 couples) would choose to marry in the first three years, a pattern that has been observed in Massachusetts and elsewhere. The marriages that would occur in the first year alone would bring over $34.1 million in revenue to the state of Michigan that year.

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  • Estimating the Economic Boost of Extending Marriage to Same-Sex Couples in Nevada

    By M.V. Lee Badgett, Christy Mallory
    June 2014

    Extending marriage to same-sex couples in Nevada would generate an additional $23 million to $53 million in spending to the state. According to 2010 U.S. Census, the state of Nevada has about 7,140 resident in same-sex relationships. Of those couples, 50 percent or 3,570 couples would chose to marry within the first 3 years, a pattern that has been witnessed in other states. As a result, about 2,300 marriages would occur in this first year alone; adding an additional $14 to $34 million in revenue to the state that year.

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  • Estimating the Economic Boost of Marriage for Same-Sex Couples in Arizona

    By E.G. Fitzgerald, Christy Mallory, M.V. Lee Badgett
    June 2014

    Extending marriage to same-sex couples in Arizona would generate an estimated $61.9 million in spending to the state economy. This economic boost would add $5.1 million in sales tax revenue to the state coffer and spending related to same-sex couples’ wedding ceremonies and celebrations could generate up to 517 full- and part-time jobs in the state. According to 2010 U.S. Census data, 15,817 same-sex couples live in Arizona. Of those couples, an estimated 50 percent or 7,909 couples would choose to marry in the first three years.

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  • Friend-of-the-Court Briefs Submitted by Williams Institute Scholars in 6th Circuit Marriage Cases

    June 2014

    Williams Institute scholars, along with leading women’s legal organizations, filed an amicus brief in the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Sixth Circuit in the cases of Bourke v. Beshear, Tanco v. Haslam, and DeBoer v. Snyder. The amicus briefs argue that, like laws that discriminate based on sex, laws that discriminate based on sexual orientation warrant heightened judicial scrutiny because, among other considerations, such laws are based on overbroad gender stereotypes. Williams Institute Distinguished Scholar, Gary Gates, also submitted briefs on the demographic same-sex couples and their families in Kentucky, Tennessee, and Michigan.

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  • Estimating the Economic Boost of Marriage for Same-Sex Couples in Indiana

    By E.G. Fitzgerald, Christy Mallory, M.V. Lee Badgett
    May 2014

    Extending marriage to same-sex couples in Indiana would generate over $39 million in spending to the state economy. According to 2010 U.S. Census, 11,074 same-sex couples live in Indiana. Of those couples, an estimated 50 percent (or 5,537 couples) would choose to marry in the first three years. Over 3,000 marriages would occur in the first year alone, and bring up to $25 million in revenue to the state that year. Spending related to same-sex couples’ wedding ceremonies and celebrations would generate 564 full- and part-time jobs in the state.

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  • Friend-of-the-Court Briefs Submitted by Williams Institute Scholars in 6th Circuit Marriage Case

    May 2014

    Williams Institute scholars, along with leading women’s legal organizations, filed an amicus brief in the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Sixth Circuit in the case of Obergefell v. Himes. The amicus brief argues that, like laws that discriminate based on sex, laws that discriminate based on sexual orientation warrant heightened judicial scrutiny because, among other considerations, such laws are based on overbroad gender stereotypes. Williams Institute Distinguished Scholar, Gary Gates, also submitted a brief on the demographic of same-sex couples and their families in Ohio.

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  • Estimating the Economic Boost of Extending Marriage to Same-Sex Couples in Utah

    By E.G. Fitzgerald, Christy Mallory, M.V. Lee Badgett
    April 2014

    Extending marriage to same-sex couples in Utah would generate up to $15.5 million in spending to the state economy. According to 2010 U.S. Census, the most recent data available, 3,909 same-sex couples live in Utah. Of those couples, the Institute estimates that 50 percent (1,955 couples) would choose to marry in the first three years.

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  • Friend-of-the-Court Briefs Submitted by Williams Institute Scholars in 4th Circuit Marriage Case

    April 2014

    Williams Institute scholars, along with the National Women’s Law Center and other leading women’s legal organizations, filed an amicus brief in the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Fourth Circuit in the case of Bostic v. Schaefer. Williams Institute Distinguished Scholar, Gary Gates, also submitted a brief shedding light on the demographic and economic characteristics of same-sex couples and their families in Virginia.

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  • Estimating the Economic Boost of Extending Marriage to Same-Sex Couples in Virginia

    By M.V. Lee Badgett, Sheila Nezhad, Christy Mallory
    April 2014

    Extending marriage to same-sex couples in Virginia would generate up to $60 million in spending to the state economy. According to 2010 U.S. Census, the most recent data available, 14,244 same-sex couples live in Virginia. Of those couples, the Institute estimates that 50 percent (7,122 couples) would choose to marry in the first three years, a pattern that has been observed in Massachusetts and elsewhere. Nearly 5,000 marriages would occur in the first year alone, and bring up to $38 million in revenue to the state of Virginia that year.

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  • Estimating the Economic Boost of Marriage for Same-Sex Couples in Oregon

    By Erin G. Fitzgerald, Christy Mallory, M.V. Lee Badgett
    April 2014

    Extending marriage to same-sex couples in Oregon would generate nearly $50 million in spending to the state economy. According to 2010 U.S. Census, the most recent data available, 11,773 same-sex couples live in Oregon. Of those couples, the report estimates that 50 percent (5,887 couples) would choose to marry in the first three years, a pattern that has been observed in Massachusetts and elsewhere. Nearly 4,000 marriages would occur in the first year alone, and bring over $30 million in revenue to the state of Oregon that year.

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  • Estimating the Economic Boost of Marriage for Same-Sex Couples in Colorado

    By Lee Badgett, Christy Mallory
    April 2014

    Extending marriage to same-sex couples in Colorado would generate $50 million in spending to the state and local economy. According to the 2010 U.S. Census, 12,424 same-sex couples live in Colorado. Of those couples, the Institute estimates that 50% (6,212 couples) would choose to marry in the first three years, a pattern that has been observed in Massachusetts and elsewhere. Of the couples that will marry, 64% of those marriages will occur during the first year, 21% in the second year and 15% in the third years.

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  • Friend-of-the-Court Briefs Submitted by Williams Institute Scholars in 9th Circuit Marriage Case

    October 2013

    Williams Institute scholars, along with the National Women’s Law Center and other leading women’s legal organizations, filed an amicus brief in the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Ninth Circuit in the case of Sevcik v. Sandoval. Williams Institute Distinguished Scholar, Gary Gates, also submitted a brief shedding light on the demographic and economic characteristics of same-sex couples and their families in Nevada.

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  • Estimating the Economic Boost of Marriage Equality in Minnesota

    By Angeliki Kastanis, M.V. Lee Badgett
    April 2013

    Extending marriage rights to same-sex couples in Minnesota would bring an estimated $42 million to the state and local economy. According to the 2010 U.S. Census, 10,207 same-sex couples live in Minnesota. Total state and local tax revenue would rise by $3 million, including an estimated $128,000 in local taxes. As seen in Iowa, same-sex couples from neighboring states that do not allow same-sex couples to marry may travel to Minnesota and generate additional spending on wedding and tourism-related goods and services.

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  • Public Support for Marriage for Same-sex Couples by State

    By Andrew R. Flores, Scott Barclay
    April 2013

    By the end of 2012, 12 states and the District of Columbia had support for same-sex marriage at or above 50%. Of these 12 states, all currently perform marriages, civil unions, or domestic partnerships for same-sex couples. Thirteen additional states presently are within 5 percentage points of majority support. In the last eight years, every state has increased in its support for marriage for same-sex couples with an average increase of 13.6%. If present public opinion trends continue, another 8 states will be above 50% support by the end of 2014.

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