International

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    The Relationship between LGBT Inclusion and Economic Development: An Analysis of Emerging Economies

    By M.V. Lee Badgett, Sheila Nezhad, Kees Waaldijk, Yana van der Meulen Rodgers
    November 2014

    When LGBT people are denied full participation in society because of their identities, their human rights are violated, and those violations of human rights are likely to have a harmful effect on a country’s level of economic development. This study analyzes the impact of the treatment of lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender people on economic development in 39 emerging economies and other selected countries, and presents findings that demonstrate a link between LGBT rights and economic output.

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    The Price of Exclusion: A Research Guide

    By Andrew Park
    December 2015

    This research guide includes bibliographic references to research about the impact of discrimination against LGBT people, including poverty, lost productivity, homelessness, depression and suicide. The guide accompanies the United Nations video titled “The Price of Exclusion,” narrated by Zachery Quinto. The UN released the video to commemorate the anniversary of the signing of the United Nations Declaration on Human Rights. This guide provides references and summaries of the research underlying the data cited in the video, and also includes other selected research findings.

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    Colombian Constitutional Court Relies on Social Science Studies in Decision Allowing Same-sex Couples to Adopt

    The Colombian Constitutional Court ruled on November 4, 2015, that same-sex couples in Colombia can adopt children. Williams Institute scholars Abbie Goldberg, Nanette Gartrell, and Gary Gates filed a brief with the Court that reviewed social science research on psychological, emotional and educational outcomes of children of same-sex parents

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    Commentary: United States Has an Obligation to Collect Data about LGBT Discrimination

    By Andrew Park
    September 2015

    This report examines the obligation of the United States to monitor discrimination and stigma against LGBT people in the United States, particularly through the use of a national human rights institution. The report concludes that the failure to establish such monitoring mechanisms results in lost opportunities for policymakers to understand the lived reality of LGBT people.

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    Williams Institute Scholar Testifies at Constitutional Court of Colombia

    By Nan Hunter
    July 2015

    On July 30, Prof. Nan Hunter, Associate Dean at Georgetown Law and Williams Institute Distinguished Scholar, testified at the Constitutional Court in Bogota, Columbia. An expert on matrimonial law, Hunter was invited to testify at a hearing to decide whether to extend equal marriage rights to same-sex couples.

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    United Nations Human Rights Council Recommends the United States Establish a National Human Rights Body

    By Andrew Park
    May 2015

    On May 15, 2015, the Human Rights Council of the United Nations issued a draft report with a series of recommendations to the United States government to rectify human rights violations. Every four years, the United Nations Human Rights Council (UNHRC) reviews the human rights record of each country. The review of the U.S. began last fall and involved many months of data collection by the U.N. and testimony by hundreds of participants.

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    Lee Badgett speaks to Irish community ahead of referendum

    M.V. Lee Badgett, Williams Distinguished Scholar, presented her research about marriage to an Irish audience on March 19, 2015 at a conference in Dublin, Ireland. On May 22, 2015, voters in Ireland will decide whether to approve a referendum amending Ireland’s constitution to permit same-sex marriage. If the measure is passed, Ireland will become the world’s first country to adopt marriage equality by a popular vote.

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    Making Transgender Count

    By Jody Herman, Andrew Flores, et al.
    February 2015

    The February 2015 edition of Transgender Studies Quarterly includes two articles co-authored by Williams Institute researchers. TSQ: Transgender Studies Quarterly offers a high-profile venue for innovative research and scholarship that contest the objectification, pathologization, and exoticization of transgender lives. It will publish interdisciplinary work that explores the diversity of gender, sex, sexuality, embodiment, and identity in ways that have not been adequately addressed by feminist and queer scholarship.

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    Williams Institute Provides Research to United Nations Countries

    Andrew Park
    April 2015

    Williams Institute International Program Director Andrew Park provided legal analysis and research to 14 countries on the United Nations Human Rights Council: Argentina, Bolivia, Brazil, Cuba, Mexico, Paraguay, Japan, Republic of Korea, France, Germany, Ireland and the Netherlands regarding the human rights situation in the United States. In April 2015, the UN Human Rights Council will review the human situation in the United States. That review, to take place at the United Nations, will include questions about legal protections available to LGBT people in the United States.

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    Dutch Adolescents from Lesbian-Parent Families: How Do They Compare to Peers with Heterosexual Parents and What is the Impact of Homophobic Stigmatization?

    By Loes van Rijn-van Gelderen, Henry M.W. Bos, Nanette K. Gartrell
    February 2015

    Dutch adolescents with lesbian parents do not show any more problem behavior than those with heterosexual parents. Yet even though in 2001 the Netherlands was the first country to legalize same-sex marriage, some adolescents in this study reported being stigmatized for having lesbian mothers. The more homophobic stigmatization they faced, the more problem behavior they showed.

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    Williams Institute Hosts Research Meeting in Nepal

    The Williams Institute, in conjunction with the Blue Diamond Society, held a two day conference in Kathmandu, Nepal, to advance the knowledge and understanding of sexual and gender minorities. Nepal was the first country in the world to legally recognize a third gender. After a failed government attempt to conduct a national census of third gender Nepalese, the United Nations Development Program supported the Williams Institute and The Blue Diamond Society to design and conduct a survey of sexual and gender minorities in Nepal.

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    Williams Expert Presents Research in Lima, Peru // Experta del Williams Institute presenta investigación en Lima, Perú

    By M.V. Lee Badgett
    October 2014

    M.V. Lee Badgett, Distinguished Scholar at the Williams Institute and director of the Center for Public Policy and Administration at the University of Massachusetts Amherst, visited Lima Peru in October, 2014, to present findings of research indicating a link between exclusion, economic growth. Badgett has become the foremost expert on the relationship between exclusion of LGBT people, economic growth and business productivity. She recently co-authored a multi-country study on the link between equality laws and economic growth.

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    Williams Institute Hosts Precedent-Setting Meeting on International Development

    Hundreds of international advocates, government officials and human development practitioners attended a day-long series of presentations and discussions in Washington, D.C. focusing on the role of sexual orientation and gender identity in international human and economic development.  This meeting featured experts from the World Bank, the United Nations, representatives from some of the major donor …

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    Public Attitudes toward Homosexuality and Gay Rights across Time and Countries

    By Tom W. Smith, Jaesok Son, Jibum Kim
    November 2014

    A new study finds that there has been a notable global increase in the acceptance of homosexuality over the past 20 years. This study examines the responses to 2000 questions asked in hundreds of surveys since 1981. Each included questions about attitudes regarding lesbians and gay men in 10 to 52 countries. The findings show that residents in 90% of all surveyed countries have become more accepting of homosexuality over the past 20 years.

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    Surveying Nepal’s Sexual and Gender Minorities: An Inclusive Approach

    Williams Institute, Blue Diamond Society
    October 2014

    In a survey of sexual and gender minorities in Nepal over 60 percent of respondents reported experiencing at least one incident of abuse or discrimination, and over one-third reported discrimination or abuse in three or more public settings. The survey utilized Nepal’s inclusion of a third gender category in its national census, the first such attempt in the world.

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    Lack of Equal Treatment and Access to Equal Opportunity for LGTBQ People in the United States

    By Andrew Park, Firass Halawi
    September 2014

    The lack of protections against employment discrimination and inattention to the causes and patterns of LGBT poverty constitute human rights violations. Based on social science research and legal analysis, the United States is failing to comply with its international human rights commitments, particularly in the areas of employment, health, youth and violence against LGBT people. In its last review, the United States accepted recommendations to address discrimination against LGBT people in order to comply with international human rights standards.

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    Submission to the Australian Senate Legal and Constitutional Affairs Committee Regarding the Recognition of Foreign Marriages Bill 2014

    By M. V. Lee Badgett
    August 2014

    In her testimony submitted to the Australian Senate Legal and Constitutional Affairs Committee, Williams Distinguished Scholar M. V. Lee Badgett highlights three issues involving the likely impact of Recognition of the Foreign Marriages Bill 2014. Based on experiences in the United States and the Netherlands, allowing same-sex couples to marry has had positive effects on couples, their children, and their families. Data from both countries also shows that civil unions are not a good substitute for marriage.

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    Amici Brief: Constitutional Court of the Republic of Colombia

    By Abbie E. Goldberg, Nanette K. Gartrell, Gary J. Gates
    August 2014

    Williams Institute scholars filed an amici brief in two cases regarding adoption rights of same-sex couples that are pending before the Constitutional Court of the Republic of Colombia. Research indicates lesbian, gay and bisexual (LGB) parents and their children are functioning well, despite confronting discrimination in a variety of social contexts—including healthcare, legal and school systems. The two cases before the Court — Turandot v. Defensor Segundo de Familia de Rionegro and In the Matter of Diego Andrés Prada Vargas —concern the constitutionality of law barring adoption rights of same-sex couples.

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    Testimony on Workplace Discrimination to High Officials of Montenegrin Government

    By Andrew Park
    July 17, 2014

    Andrew Park, Director of International Programs, testified before a meeting of the ministries of Health, Labor, Human Rights, Justice and Interior in Podgorica, Montenegro. The ministries were meeting to evaluate Montenegro’s compliance with the international human rights standards. Park’s testimony focused on workplace discrimination issues as well as the response of Montenegro’s Supreme Prosecutor to incidents of hate crimes.

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    Universal Periodic Review of the United States: Sub-group on Civil Rights and Racial and Ethnic Discrimination Issues

    By Andrew Park, Adam P. Romero
    July 2014

    Based on State Department testimony by Williams Institute scholars, social science research and legal analysis suggest the United States is failing to comply with international human rights standards in relation to LGBT people. While the U.S. has seen significant progress in recent years, a majority of states fail to provide legal protections for LGBT people and families, despite evidence of persistent and pervasive discrimination, economic vulnerability, and violence and sexual assault.

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