Research

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    Estimates of Marriages of Same-Sex Couples at the Two-Year Anniversary of Obergefell v. Hodges

    Adam P. Romero
    June 2017

    Over 150,000 same-sex couples have married since the U.S. Supreme Court extended marriage equality nationwide. In total, over 1.1 million LGBT adults are currently married to a same-sex partner.

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    Unmet Public Health Needs Among Transgender People in the U.S. Include Poor General Health and Lack of Access to Health Care

    Dr. Ilan H. Meyer with Taylor N.T. Brown and Dr. Jody L. Herman, the Williams Institute; Dr. Sari L. Reisner, Harvard Medical School and Boston Children’s Hospital; Dr. Walter O. Bockting, Columbia University Medical Center, May 2017

    Transgender adults in the U.S. are more likely than cisgender adults to report poor health and lack of health insurance coverage. The study is the first to analyze health data from the Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System, a nationally representative survey that includes questions to identify transgender individuals in 19 states and one U.S. territory.

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    Criminalización del VIH Contra Inmigrantes en California

    Amira Hasenbush, Bianca D.M. Wilson, mayo de 2017

    Una traducción nueva de un informe que fue publicado en el otoño de 2016 indica que para unos inmigrantes, un delito penal relacionado con el VIH podria haber sido un evento que ocasionó procesos de deportación. En el informe Criminalización del VIH Contra Inmigrantes en California, investigadoras del Instituto Williams, Amira Hasenbush y Bianca D.M. Wilson, utilizaron los datos de la Información del Registro de Antecedentes Penales de California para explorer cómo las leyes penales sobre el VIH en California se aplican contra los residentes nacidos en el extranjero.

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    Legacies and Lessons – Sexual Violence Against Men and Boys in Sri Lanka and Bosnia & Herzegovina

    All Survivors Project, May 2017

    Evidence shows that most known incidents of sexual violence against men and boys in both Bosnia & Herzegovina and Sri Lanka took place in detention settings. In both places stigma and shame, along with other factors, remain powerful deterrents to reporting. A combination of an inadequate and complex legal framework, coupled with the lack of expertise in responding to sexual violence against men and boys, have prevented survivors from reporting these violations and accessing justice.

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    The Impact of Stigma and Discrimination against LGBT People in Texas

    by Christy Mallory, Taylor N.T. Brown, Stephen Russell & Brad Sears, April 2017

    Texas’s legal landscape and social climate contribute to an environment in which LGBT people are at risk of experiencing stigma and harassment. Stigma and discrimination can lead to economic instability and poorer health for LGBT people. These individual-level outcomes, in turn, can negatively impact the state, businesses, and the economy in a number of ways.

    The study documents the prevalence and impact on LGBT people of several forms of stigma and discrimination, including harassment and discrimination in employment, housing, and public accommodations; harassment and bullying in schools; and family rejection. The study also discusses the economic implications of such discrimination.

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    LGBQ Youth Disproportionately Incarcerated in the U.S. Juvenile Justice System 

    Bianca D.M. Wilson, Ph.D., Sid P. Jordan, J.D., Ilan H. Meyer, Ph.D., Andrew R. Flores, Ph.D., Lara Stemple, J.D., and Jody L. Herman, Ph.D., April 2017

    Researchers consider the extent to which sexual minority youth are disproportionately incarcerated in the U.S. juvenile detention system and whether sexual minority youth are incarcerated for longer periods than heterosexual youth. The study also considers the prevalence of sexual victimization while in custody for sexual minority youth compared to their heterosexual peers of the same gender. Sexual minority youth include those that identify as lesbian, gay, or bisexual, as well as those that identified as mostly straight but had some attraction to the same sex.

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    Indonesian Economy Hurt by Discrimination Against LGBT People

    M.V. Lee Badgett, Amira Hasenbush, Winston Ekaprasetia Luhur, March 2017

    Discrimination against lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender (LGBT) Indonesians in workplaces, schools, and social opportunities is pervasive and will limit their ability to fully contribute to the Indonesian economy. A new study shows that the cost of discrimination to the Indonesian economy could range from nearly 900 million to 12 billion US dollars.

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    Exploring International Priorities & Best Practices for Collecting Data on Gender Minorities

    Taylor N.T Brown, Jody L. Herman, Andrew Park, March 2017

    On June 17th, 2016, researchers at the Williams Institute, along with a steering committee of advisers, convened an international meeting of experts in Amsterdam. The purpose was to consider the current lack of international standards for collecting data about gender minorities in official, large-scale surveys.

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    Scholars File Amici Brief in Gloucester County School Board v. GG

    On March 2, 2017, sixty scholars who study the transgender population–many of whom are affiliated with the Williams Institute–filed an amici curiae brief with the U.S. Supreme Court in Gloucester County School Board v. GG. The case concerns a transgender student’s access to school facilities consistent with his gender identity.

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    Population-Based Study Shows No Difference in Outcomes Among Children Raised by Same-Sex and Different-Sex Parent Families in the Netherlands

    Henny M.W. Bos, PhD, University of Amsterdam, Nanette K. Gartrell, MD, Lisette Kuyer, PhD, February 2017

    A new study found that there was no difference in child outcomes among Dutch same-sex and different-sex parent families. Based upon a nationally representative sample from the Netherlands, the study compared same-sex and different-sex parent households on children’s psychological well-being, parenting stress, and the parents’ use of informal and formal support in child rearing.

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    Media Advisory: Fact Sheet on Guidance Protecting Over 350,000 Transgender Youth and Young Adults From Discrimination

    News outlets are reporting that the U.S. Departments of Education and Justice will withdraw legal guidance that protects over 350,000 transgender youth and young adults in the United States from discrimination in education. The Williams Institute is providing this fact sheet to assist with reporting on the issue. Williams Institute scholars are available for comment.

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    There are Over 75,000 LGBT DREAMers; 36,000 Have Participated in DACA

    Kerith Conron and Taylor N.T. Brown, February 2017

    The Williams Institute estimates that there are over 75,000 LGBT DREAMers in the U.S. and over 36,000 have participated in Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals (DACA), including 24,000 who renewed in the program. DACA allowed undocumented immigrants who entered the United States before the age of 16, and met other requirements, temporary work authorization and protection from deportation for a renewable two-year period.

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    94,700 LGBT Workers in Tennessee Lack Statewide Protections Against Ongoing Employment Discrimination

    Christy Mallory and Brad Sears, February 2017

    Adding sexual orientation and gender identity to the state’s existing non-discrimination law would protect these workers, and would not be costly or burdensome for the state to enforce.

    Approximately 94,700 LGBT workers in Tennessee are vulnerable to employment discrimination absent explicit statewide legal protections.

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    Incarceration Rate of LGB People Three Times the General Population

    Ilan H. Meyer, PhD, Andrew R. Flores, PhD, Lara Stemple, JD, Adam P. Romero, JD, Bianca D.M. Wilson, PhD, and Jody L. Herman, PhD., February 2017

    A new study by scholars at the Williams Institute found that sexual minorities are incarcerated at disproportionately high rates, and once incarcerated they are more likely to experience mistreatment, harsh punishment, and sexual victimization. Approximately 238,000 sexual minorities are incarcerated in the United States. The nationwide incarceration rate of sexual minorities was previously unknown.

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    Scholars File Amici Brief On Transgender Youth

    On January 30, 2017, 62 scholars who study the transgender population–many of whom are affiliated with the Williams Institute–filed an amici curiae brief with the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Seventh Circuit in Whitaker v. Kenosha School District.  The appeal concerns a transgender student’s access to facilities consistent with his gender identity.  In their …

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    Stigma and Discrimination Against LGBT People in Georgia Negatively Impact 300,000 LGBT Adults and 58,200 LGBT Youth in the State

    Christy Mallory, Brad Sears, Eric R. Wright & Kerith Conron, January 2017

    Georgia’s unsupportive legal landscape and social climate contribute to an environment in which LGBT people are at risk of discrimination and harassment, with costs estimated in the hundreds of millions.

    This study estimated costs related to discrimination against LGBT people in employment and other settings; to bullying and family rejection of LGBT youth; and to health disparities resulting from a challenging climate for LGBT people. The study drew upon state-level data to estimate some of the cost savings that would result if Georgia were to move towards creating a more accepting environment for its 300,000 LGBT adults and 58,200 LGBT youth.

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    New Estimates Show that 150,000 Youth Ages 13 to 17 Identify as Transgender in the US

    Jody L. Herman, Andrew R. Flores, Taylor N. T. Brown, Bianca D.M. Wilson, and Kerith J. Conron, January 2017

    An estimated 0.7 percent of youth ages 13 to 17, or 150,000 youth, identify as transgender in the United States, according to a new study released by The Williams Institute at the UCLA School of Law. This study is the first to provide population estimates for youth who identify as transgender in each of the 50 states, plus the District of Columbia.

    The study provides new estimates of the age composition of individuals who identify as transgender in the U.S. and estimates of the size of the transgender-identified population by age group. The youngest age group, 13 to 17, has the highest estimated percentage of individuals who identify as transgender.

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    If Passed, Virginia House Bill 1612 Would Negatively Impact 34,500 Transgender Adults and Thousands of Transgender Youth

    On January 11, a Virginia lawmaker offered House Bill 1612 (HB 1612), which would require transgender people to use bathrooms in public schools, government buildings, and public universities based on “sex,” as determined by one’s “original birth certificate.” Additionally, the bill would require schools to inform parents or guardians within 24 hours if their child seeks “to be recognized or treated as the opposite sex, to use a name or pronouns inconsistent with the child’s sex, or to use a restroom or changing facility designated for the opposite sex.”

    HB 1612 would negatively impact over 34,000 transgender adults in Virginia. Virginia ranks 24th in the United States in terms of adults who identify as transgender (0.55 percent) and over 40 percent of transgender adults in Virginia are People of Color, including 25 percent who identify as non-Hispanic Black or African-American and 10 percent who identify as Hispanic or Latino.

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    Public Opinion on Transgender Rights: A Twenty-Three Country Survey

    Andrew R. Flores, Taylor N.T. Brown, and Andrew S. Park, December 2016

    Transgender rights have emerged as a central feature in the discourse on LGBT rights in many countries; however, little is known about public support for such rights around the globe. This report presents findings from a ground-breaking survey of 17,105 adults across 23 countries about their attitudes towards transgender people and rights.

    This study provides evidence of high levels of support for transgender rights, as well as instances of strong opposition.

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    Scholars File Amici Brief On Constitutionality of Mississippi Statute

    On December 22, 2016, 82 scholars who study the LGBT population–many of whom are affiliated with the Williams Institute–filed an amici curiae brief with the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Fifth Circuit in Barber v. Bryant and Campaign for Southern Equality v. Bryant. These appeals concern the constitutionality of Mississippi’s House Bill 1523, which elevates three anti-LGBT religious beliefs …

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