Research

  • Family

    Research Report on LGB-Parent Families

    By Abbie E. Goldberg, Nanette K. Gartrell, Gary Gates
    July 2014

    LGB parenting has grown more visible over the past few decades. Research on LGB parents and their children has proliferated alongside this increasing visibility. This report addresses the research on LGB parenting, focusing on several main content areas: family building by LGB people, the transition to parenthood for LGB parents, and functioning and experiences of LGB parents and their children. In addition to discussing what we know about LGB-parent families, we identify gaps in our knowledge, and highlight key areas that future studies should aim to address.

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  • TX-img

    Estimating the Economic Boost of Marriage for Same-Sex Couples in Texas

    By E.G. Fitzgerald, Christy Mallory, M.V. Lee Badgett
    July 2014

    Extending marriage to same-sex couples in Texas would generate an estimated $181.6 million in spending to the state economy. According to the 2010 U.S. Census, the most recent data available, 46,401 same-sex couples live in Texas. Of those couples, the Institute estimates that 50 percent (23,200 couples) would choose to marry in the first three years. Over 14,848 marriages would occur in the first year alone, and bring up to $116 million in revenue to the state of Texas that year.

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  • Mental Health and Suicidality Among Racially/Ethnically Diverse Sexual Minority Youths

    By Wendy B. Bostwick, Ilan Meyer, et al.
    July 2014

    Sexual minority youth had higher prevalence than heterosexual youth of each of the six outcomes studied, including self-harm, feeling sad, and suicide ideation, planning, and attempts. The study shows that 22.8 percent of sexual minority youth compared with 6.6 percent of heterosexual youth had attempted suicide in the year prior to being surveyed. Notably, the odds of suicide ideation, planning, and attempt among sexual minority youth varied by race/ethnicity.

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  • Universal Periodic Review of the United States: Sub-group on Civil Rights and Racial and Ethnic Discrimination Issues

    By Andrew Park, Adam P. Romero
    July 2014

    Based on State Department testimony by Williams Institute scholars, social science research and legal analysis suggest the United States is failing to comply with international human rights standards in relation to LGBT people. While the U.S. has seen significant progress in recent years, a majority of states fail to provide legal protections for LGBT people and families, despite evidence of persistent and pervasive discrimination, economic vulnerability, and violence and sexual assault.

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  • The Role of Help-Seeking in Preventing Suicide Attempts among Lesbians, Gay Men, and Bisexuals

    By Ilan Meyer, Merilee Teylan, Sharon Schwartz
    June 2014

    Lesbians, gay men and bisexuals (LGB) who sought help from religious or spiritual sources were more likely to commit suicide than those who sought treatment from a health care provider or who did not seek treatment at all. Only about 16 percent of LGB people who made a serious suicide attempt sought mental health treatment from a health professional prior to the attempt; about 13 percent sought religious or spiritual treatment prior to the attempt.

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  • Estimating the Economic Boost of Extending Marriage to Same-Sex Couples in Nevada

    By M.V. Lee Badgett, Christy Mallory
    June 2014

    Extending marriage to same-sex couples in Nevada would generate an additional $23 million to $53 million in spending to the state. According to 2010 U.S. Census, the state of Nevada has about 7,140 resident in same-sex relationships. Of those couples, 50 percent or 3,570 couples would chose to marry within the first 3 years, a pattern that has been witnessed in other states. As a result, about 2,300 marriages would occur in this first year alone; adding an additional $14 to $34 million in revenue to the state that year.

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  • Estimating the Economic Boost of Marriage for Same-Sex Couples in Arizona

    By E.G. Fitzgerald, Christy Mallory, M.V. Lee Badgett
    June 2014

    Extending marriage to same-sex couples in Arizona would generate an estimated $61.9 million in spending to the state economy. This economic boost would add $5.1 million in sales tax revenue to the state coffer and spending related to same-sex couples’ wedding ceremonies and celebrations could generate up to 517 full- and part-time jobs in the state. According to 2010 U.S. Census data, 15,817 same-sex couples live in Arizona. Of those couples, an estimated 50 percent or 7,909 couples would choose to marry in the first three years.

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  • Transgender Military Service in the United States

    By Gary J. Gates, Jody L. Herman
    May 2014

    An estimated 150,000 transgender individuals have served in the U.S. armed forces, or are currently on active duty. In addition, an estimated 134,000 transgender individuals are veterans or are retired from Guard or Reserve service, 8,800 transgender adults are currently on active duty in the U.S. armed forces, and an estimated 6,700 transgender individuals are serving in the Guard or Reserve forces. Transgender individuals assigned female at birth are nearly three times more likely than all adult women, and those assigned male at birth are 1.6 times more likely than all adult men, to serve.

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  • Friend-of-the-Court Briefs Submitted by Williams Institute Scholars in 6th Circuit Marriage Cases

    June 2014

    Williams Institute scholars, along with leading women’s legal organizations, filed an amicus brief in the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Sixth Circuit in the cases of Bourke v. Beshear, Tanco v. Haslam, and DeBoer v. Snyder. The amicus briefs argue that, like laws that discriminate based on sex, laws that discriminate based on sexual orientation warrant heightened judicial scrutiny because, among other considerations, such laws are based on overbroad gender stereotypes. Williams Institute Distinguished Scholar, Gary Gates, also submitted briefs on the demographic same-sex couples and their families in Kentucky, Tennessee, and Michigan.

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  • Estimating the Economic Boost of Marriage for Same-Sex Couples in Pennsylvania

    By E.G. Fitzgerald, M.V. Lee Badgett
    May 2014

    Extending marriage to same-sex couples in Pennsylvania would generate between $65 million to $92.1 million to the state and local economy of Pennsylvania over the course of three years, with a $42 million to $58.9 million boost in the first year alone. This economic boost would add $4.2 million to $5.8 million in sales tax revenue to state and local coffers. Spending related to same-sex couples’ wedding ceremonies and celebrations would also generate 812 to 1,142 full- and part-time jobs in the state.

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  • Predictors of parenting stress in lesbian, gay, and heterosexual adoptive parents during early parenthood

    By Abbie E. Goldberg, JuliAnna Z. Smith
    May 2014

    Sexual orientation is not a predictor of parenting stress among first-time adoptive parents, based on the first longitudinal study of parenting stress in early childhood among lesbian, gay and heterosexual adoptive parents. Parents’ pre-placement well-being, relationship quality, and social support are pre-adoptive assessments that could impact post-adoptive stress. Consistent with prior research, the study also found a child’s age at placement to be a predictor of post-placement parenting stress, such that parents of older children reported more stress.

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  • Seeking to Adopt in Florida: Lesbian and Gay Parents Navigate the Legal Process

    By Abbie E. Goldberg, Elizabeth R. Webera, April M. Moyera, Julie Shapirob
    May 2014

    Utilizing interview data from 22 lesbian and gay parents in Florida, the current exploratory study examined participants’ experiences navigating the legal and social service systems after the repeal of the Florida ban on gay adoption. Participants reported both positive and negative experiences in seeking out lawyers, working with social service agencies in an effort to adopt, and interfacing with the judicial system. This study furthers our knowledge of the lingering effects of discriminatory laws even after such laws have been formally removed.

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  • Estimating the Economic Boost of Marriage for Same-Sex Couples in Indiana

    By E.G. Fitzgerald, Christy Mallory, M.V. Lee Badgett
    May 2014

    Extending marriage to same-sex couples in Indiana would generate over $39 million in spending to the state economy. According to 2010 U.S. Census, 11,074 same-sex couples live in Indiana. Of those couples, an estimated 50 percent (or 5,537 couples) would choose to marry in the first three years. Over 3,000 marriages would occur in the first year alone, and bring up to $25 million in revenue to the state that year. Spending related to same-sex couples’ wedding ceremonies and celebrations would generate 564 full- and part-time jobs in the state.

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  • Employment and Housing Discrimination Based on Sexual Orientation and Gender Identity in Idaho

    By Amira Hasenbush, Christy Mallory
    May 2014

    Approximately 21,000 LGBT workers in Idaho are vulnerable to employment discrimination absent state or federal legal protections. Approximately 72% of Idaho’s workforce is not covered by a local ordinance prohibiting employment discrimination based on sexual orientation or gender identity, and 75% of Idaho residents are not protected against housing discrimination based on sexual orientation or gender identity.

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  • Update: Economic Motives for Adopting LGBT-Related Workplace Policies

    By Brad Sears, Christy Mallory
    October 2011

    Ninety-eight percent of the country’s largest companies now prohibit discrimination based on sexual orientation and nearly 85 percent prohibit discrimination based on gender identity. The study also finds that 86 percent of the top 50 federal contractors prohibit discrimination based on sexual orientation and over 60 percent prohibit discrimination based on gender identity. Combined, these contractors represent 48 percent of all contracting dollars awarded by the federal government—over $218 billion in spending.

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  • Friend-of-the-Court Briefs Submitted by Williams Institute Scholars in 6th Circuit Marriage Case

    May 2014

    Williams Institute scholars, along with leading women’s legal organizations, filed an amicus brief in the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Sixth Circuit in the case of Obergefell v. Himes. The amicus brief argues that, like laws that discriminate based on sex, laws that discriminate based on sexual orientation warrant heightened judicial scrutiny because, among other considerations, such laws are based on overbroad gender stereotypes. Williams Institute Distinguished Scholar, Gary Gates, also submitted a brief on the demographic of same-sex couples and their families in Ohio.

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  • The Sexual Victimization of Men in America: New Data Challenge Old Assumptions

    By Lara Stemple, Ilan H. Meyer
    April 2014

    Based on the analysis of large-scale federal agency surveys, men experience a high prevalence of sexual victimization, in many circumstances similar to the prevalence found among women. In one of the studies included in the analysis, the CDC found that an estimated 1.3 million women experienced nonconsensual sex, or rape, in the previous year. Notably, nearly the same number of men also reported nonconsensual sex. In comparison to the large number of women who were raped, nearly 1.3 million men were “made to penetrate” someone else.

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  • Protective School Climates and Reduced Risk for Suicide Ideation in Sexual Minority Youth

    By Mark L. Hatzenbuehler, Michelle Birkett, Aimee Van Wagenen, Ilan H. Meyer
    April 2014

    Lesbian, gay, and bisexual (LGB) youth living in states and cities with more protective school climates are significantly less likely to report one-year suicidal thoughts than LGB youths living in states and cities with less protective school climates. Of schools in eight national cities and states, about half provided Gay-Straight Alliances and LGBT inclusive health curricula, and almost all provided anti-bullying policies prohibiting harassment based on sexual orientation or gender identity.

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  • Estimating the Economic Boost of Extending Marriage to Same-Sex Couples in Utah

    By E.G. Fitzgerald, Christy Mallory, M.V. Lee Badgett
    April 2014

    Extending marriage to same-sex couples in Utah would generate up to $15.5 million in spending to the state economy. According to 2010 U.S. Census, the most recent data available, 3,909 same-sex couples live in Utah. Of those couples, the Institute estimates that 50 percent (1,955 couples) would choose to marry in the first three years.

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  • Friend-of-the-Court Briefs Submitted by Williams Institute Scholars in 4th Circuit Marriage Case

    April 2014

    Williams Institute scholars, along with the National Women’s Law Center and other leading women’s legal organizations, filed an amicus brief in the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Fourth Circuit in the case of Bostic v. Schaefer. Williams Institute Distinguished Scholar, Gary Gates, also submitted a brief shedding light on the demographic and economic characteristics of same-sex couples and their families in Virginia.

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