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    Demographics of Same-sex Couples in Kentucky, Michigan, Ohio, and Tennessee: Analyses of the 2013 American Community Survey

    By Gary J. Gates

    Analyzing data from the 2013 US American Community Survey, this report considers the demographic, economic, and geographic characteristics of same-sex couples (married and unmarried), especially those raising children, in Kentucky, Michigan, Ohio, and Tennessee. Comparisons are made with their different-sex counterparts.

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    Demographics of Married and Unmarried Same-sex Couples: Analyses of the 2013 American Community Survey

    By Gary J. Gates

    The US Census Bureau’s 2013 American Community Survey marked the first time that a large national demographic survey explicitly identified both married and unmarried same-sex couples, allowing for separate analyses of these two groups. Married same-sex couples are five times more likely to be raising adopted or foster children than their different-sex counterparts, and have more economic resources than unmarried same-sex couples. These analyses outlined compare the demographic, economic, and geographic characteristics of these two groups, especially those raising children. Comparisons are also made with married and unmarried different-sex couples.

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    Discrimination and Harassment by Law Enforcement Officers in the LGBT Community

    By Christy Mallory, Amira Hasenbush, Brad Sears
    March 2015

    Discrimination and harassment by law enforcement based on sexual orientation and gender identity is an ongoing and pervasive problem in LGBT communities. Such discrimination impedes effective policing in these communities by breaking down trust, inhibiting communication and preventing officers from effectively protecting and serving the communities they police. While a patchwork of state, local and federal laws provides some protection against certain forms of discrimination, there is no nationwide federal statute that comprehensively and consistently prohibits discrimination based on actual or perceived sexual orientation and gender identity.

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    Employment Discrimination Based on Sexual Orientation and Gender Identity in Kentucky

    By Christy Mallory, Brad Sears
    February 2015

    Approximately 80,000 LGBT workers in Kentucky are not explicitly protected from discrimination under state or federal laws. Seven localities in Kentucky prohibit discrimination based on sexual orientation and gender identity in private and public sector employment, and state government employees are protected. If sexual orientation and gender identity were added to existing statewide non-discrimination laws, 38 more complaints would be filed in Kentucky each year. The cost of enforcing those complaints would be negligible, and would not require additional court or administrative staff.

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    Employment Discrimination Based on Sexual Orientation and Gender Identity in Michigan

    By Christy Mallory, Brad Sears
    February 2015

    By Christy Mallory, Brad Sears February 2015 Approximately 184,000 LGBT workers in Michigan are not explicitly protected from discrimination under state or federal laws. Discrimination against LGBT employees in Michigan has recently been documented in surveys, complaints to community-based organizations, media reports, and other sources. Many corporate employers and public opinion in the state support protections …

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    Dutch Adolescents from Lesbian-Parent Families: How Do They Compare to Peers with Heterosexual Parents and What is the Impact of Homophobic Stigmatization?

    By Loes van Rijn-van Gelderen, Henry M.W. Bos, Nanette K. Gartrell
    February 2015

    Dutch adolescents with lesbian parents do not show any more problem behavior than those with heterosexual parents. Yet even though in 2001 the Netherlands was the first country to legalize same-sex marriage, some adolescents in this study reported being stigmatized for having lesbian mothers. The more homophobic stigmatization they faced, the more problem behavior they showed.

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    Employment Discrimination Based on Sexual Orientation and Gender Identity in Virginia

    By Christy Mallory, Brad Sears
    January 2015

    LGBT workers in Virginia are not explicitly protected from discrimination under state or federal laws. Three localities in Virginia prohibit discrimination based on sexual orientation in private and public sector employment; only one locality prohibits discrimination based on gender identity. If sexual orientation and gender identity were added to existing statewide non-discrimination laws, 5 more complaints would be filed in Virginia each year. The cost of enforcing those complaints would be negligible, and would not require additional court or administrative staff.

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    Employment Discrimination Based on Sexual Orientation and Gender Identity in Oklahoma

    By Christy Mallory, Brad Sears
    January 2015

    Approximately 62,000 LGBT workers in Oklahoma are not explicitly protected from discrimination under state or federal laws. Seven cities in Oklahoma prohibit discrimination based on sexual orientation in public sector employment, but do not include gender identity or private sector employment. If sexual orientation and gender identity were added to existing statewide non-discrimination laws, 29 more complaints would be filed in Oklahoma each year. The cost of enforcing those complaints would be negligible, and would not require additional court or administrative staff.

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    Employment Discrimination Based on Sexual Orientation and Gender Identity in Arkansas

    By Christy Mallory, Brad Sears
    January 2015

    None of the approximately 47,000 LGBT workers in Arkansas are explicitly protected from discrimination under local, state or federal laws. If sexual orientation and gender identity were added to existing statewide non-discrimination laws, 22 more complaints would be filed in Arkansas each year. The cost of enforcing those complaints would be negligible, and would not require additional court or administrative staff.

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    Same-Sex Couples in Puerto Rico: A demographic summary

    By Gary J. Gates
    January 2015

    Based on data from Census 2010, there are 6,614 same-sex couples living in Puerto Rico. The majority of same-sex couples are female (70%). In Puerto Rico, 97% of individuals in same-sex couples are Latino/a, compared to 98.8% of individuals in different-sex married couples. Fifteen percent of same-sex couples in the territory (17%) are raising children under age 18 in their homes. More than 710 same-sex-couple households in the territory are raising more than 1,250 children. Same-sex couples with children are nearly 9 times more likely to be fostering a child than different-sex married couples with children in Puerto Rico. The median annual household income of same-sex couples with children under age 18 in the home is 8% less than the median annual household income of different-sex married couples ($33,337 versus $36,367).

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    Employment Discrimination Based on Sexual Orientation and Gender Identity in Arizona

    By Christy Mallory, Brad Sears
    January 2015

    About 119,000 LGBT workers in Arizona are not explicitly protected from discrimination under state or federal laws. If sexual orientation and gender identity were added to existing statewide non-discrimination laws, 56 more complaints would be filed in Arizona each year. The cost of enforcing those complaints would be negligible, and would not require additional court or administrative staff.

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    Williams Institute Hosts Research Meeting in Nepal

    The Williams Institute, in conjunction with the Blue Diamond Society, held a two day conference in Kathmandu, Nepal, to advance the knowledge and understanding of sexual and gender minorities. Nepal was the first country in the world to legally recognize a third gender. After a failed government attempt to conduct a national census of third gender Nepalese, the United Nations Development Program supported the Williams Institute and The Blue Diamond Society to design and conduct a survey of sexual and gender minorities in Nepal.

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    Williams Expert Presents Research in Lima, Peru // Experta del Williams Institute presenta investigación en Lima, Perú

    By M.V. Lee Badgett
    October 2014

    M.V. Lee Badgett, Distinguished Scholar at the Williams Institute and director of the Center for Public Policy and Administration at the University of Massachusetts Amherst, visited Lima Peru in October, 2014, to present findings of research indicating a link between exclusion, economic growth. Badgett has become the foremost expert on the relationship between exclusion of LGBT people, economic growth and business productivity. She recently co-authored a multi-country study on the link between equality laws and economic growth.

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    Williams Institute Hosts Precedent-Setting Meeting on International Development

    Hundreds of international advocates, government officials and human development practitioners attended a day-long series of presentations and discussions in Washington, D.C. focusing on the role of sexual orientation and gender identity in international human and economic development.  This meeting featured experts from the World Bank, the United Nations, representatives from some of the major donor …

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    The LGBT Divide: A Data Portrait of LGBT People in the Midwestern, Mountain & Southern States

    By Amira Hasenbush, Andrew R. Flores, Angeliki Kastanis, Brad Sears, Gary J. Gates
    December 2014

    By Amira Hasenbush, Andrew R. Flores, Angeliki Kastanis, Brad Sears, Gary J. Gates December 2014 LGBT Americans in the 29 states without state laws that prohibit discrimination on the basis of sexual orientation consistently see greater disparities than in the 21 states with such laws, including less social acceptance, greater economic vulnerability, especially among African-American …

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    The Business Impact of Opening Marriage to Same-sex Couples

    By Angeliki Kastanis, Matt Strieker, Archipelago Web
    December 2014

    Explore how much money states have to gain by allowing same-sex couples to marry. Same-sex couples, and their out-of-town guests, pump money into state economies as they plan their weddings and celebrate their milestone. This spending boost can lead to an increase in state and local tax revenue and an influx of tourism dollars that …

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    New Data from Marriage Licenses for Same-Sex Couples

    By M.V. Lee Badgett, Christy Mallory
    December 2014

    Administrative data from the states that recognized marriage and other relationship statuses for same-sex couples in early 2014 show that female couples are more likely to formalize their relationships than male couples; and that same-sex couples overall dissolve their legal relationships at a lower rate than different-sex couples. The data also suggest that the U.S. Supreme Court’s decision in the Windsor case in 2013 likely contributed to a marked increase in the number of same-sex couples marrying.

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    LGB Vote 2014

    By Andrew R. Flores, Gary J. Gates
    December 2014

    By Andrew Flores, Gary J. Gates December 2014 Exit polls from the 2014 midterm election suggest that 4% of the electorate identified as lesbian, gay, or bisexual, representing the highest recorded LGB turnout in a midterm election since 1998. These LGB voters, 75% in fact, overwhelmingly supported Democratic candidates in key congressional races. If LGB people …

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    National Trends in Public Opinion on LGBT Rights in the United States

    By Andrew Flores
    November 2014

    This report analyzes over 325 national public opinion surveys dating back to June 1977 that ask the public their opinions on LGBT rights. The report finds that national trends indicate a rapid and significant increase over the last three decades in public support for the rights of lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender people in the United States. On average, public support for marriage equality has more than doubled since the early 2000s.

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    Public Attitudes toward Homosexuality and Gay Rights across Time and Countries

    By Tom W. Smith, Jaesok Son, Jibum Kim
    November 2014

    A new study finds that there has been a notable global increase in the acceptance of homosexuality over the past 20 years. This study examines the responses to 2000 questions asked in hundreds of surveys since 1981. Each included questions about attitudes regarding lesbians and gay men in 10 to 52 countries. The findings show that residents in 90% of all surveyed countries have become more accepting of homosexuality over the past 20 years.

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