Research

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    Profiles of Resilience and Psychosocial Outcomes among Young Black Gay and Bisexual Men

    By Patrick A. Wilson, Ilan H. Meyer, Nadav Antebi-Gruszka, Melissa R. Boone, Stephanie H. Cook, and Emily M. Cherenack
    April 2016

    This study explores different profiles of resilience factors in 228 Young Black gay/bisexual men (YBGBM) in New York City and compares profiles on psychological distress, mental health, and other psychosocial factors. Results suggest that self-efficacy and hardiness/adaptive coping may play a more important role in protecting YBGBM from risks compared to social support and should be targeted in interventions. The findings show that resilience is a multidimensional construct and support the notion that there are different patterns of resilience among YBGBM.

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    Meeting the Legal Needs of People Living with HIV: Effort, Impact, and Emerging Trends

    By Ayako Miyashita and Amira Hasenbush
    April 2016

    This report analyzes archival client services data from fourteen legal services providers dedicated to serving people living with HIV (“PLWH”) in the ten Metropolitan Statistical Areas with the largest number of HIV-positive residents. Those areas included New York, Miami, Los Angeles, Washington, D.C., Chicago, Philadelphia, San Francisco, Atlanta, Houston, and Dallas. This report includes data from 2010 through 2012 on legal needs addressed by each agency, eligibility criteria, funding, client demographics, target populations, and emerging trends in practice.

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    Notice of Proposed Rulemaking Regarding Establishing Paid Sick Leave for Federal Contractors, RIN 1235-AA13

    By Christy Mallory, Brad Sears, Adam Romero, and Jody Herman
    April 2016

    Williams Institute experts provided comments today on a proposed rule that implements Executive Order 13706, signed by President Barack Obama on September 2015, requiring federal contractors to provide paid sick leave to their employees. The rule will protect LGBT employees of federal contractors by ensuring that they have paid time off to meet the health care needs of themselves and their families.

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    Same-Sex and Different-Sex Parent Households and Child Health Outcomes: Findings from the National Survey of Children’s Health

    By Henny M.W. Bos, Justin R. Knox, Loes van Rijn-van Gelderen, and Nanette Gartrell
    April 2016

    Using the 2011–2012 National Survey of Children’s Health data set, this report compares spouse/partner relationships and parent-child relationships (family relationships), parenting stress, and children’s general health, emotional difficulties, coping behavior, and learning behavior (child outcomes) in households of same-sex (female) versus different-sex continuously coupled parents with biological offspring. Children with female same-sex parents and different-sex parents demonstrated no differences in outcomes, despite female same-sex parents reporting more parenting stress. Future studies may reveal the sources of this parenting stress.

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    The Fiscal Impact of Tennessee House Bill 2414

    By Christy Mallory, Brad Sears and Christopher Carpenter
    April 2016

    Tennessee House Bill 2414 requires public educational institutions to restrict students’ use of restrooms according to the sex assigned on their birth certificates. This policy is in conflict with several federal laws, and, if enacted, could lead to loss of federal funding, administrative enforcement proceedings, and litigation, which could result in costs and lost revenue to the State of Tennessee. This report estimates the number of transgender youth and adults in Tennessee and the amount of federal funding the state could stand to lose if the legislation were passed.

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    Voter ID Laws and Their Added Costs for Transgender Voters

    By Taylor N.T. Brown and Jody Herman
    March 2016

    There are ten states that require voters to provide photo identification in order to vote at the polls and mandate that those who do not do so undertake additional steps to ensure their vote is counted. Transgender people who are residents of these states with strict photo identification requirements for voting may face unique challenges when voting at the polls. To ensure that they are able to vote at the polls, potential voters need to make sure that their appearance, photo ID, and voter registration information match. In this report, we examine in detail the additional steps and costs that transgender people may encounter in order to vote at the polls in states with the strictest photo identification laws.

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    LGB within the T: Sexual Orientation in the National Transgender Discrimination Survey and Implications for Public Policy

    By Jody Herman
    March 2016

    This book chapter examines sexual orientation and discrimination experienced by transgender people, using data from the National Transgender Discrimination Survey. This study explores how respondents to the NTDS identified their sexual orientation, how those responses differ based on demographic variables (e.g. age, race, and gender), and how respondents’ experiences of discrimination and outcomes differ based on sexual orientation.

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    Reachable: Data collection methods for sexual orientation and gender identity

    By Andrew Park
    March 17, 2016

    Sexual and gender minorities have often been classified as “hard-to-reach” populations, particularly in middle and low income countries. However, recent developments in data collection methods demonstrate the increasing number of tools available to those seeking to understand the lived realities of sexual and gender minorities in many areas of the globe. Reachable highlight examples of measurements of sexual orientation and gender identity, and provides a brief number of examples of their use around the world, particularly in the areas of health, education and employment.

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    LGBT in the South

    By Christy Mallory, Andrew Flores and Brad Sears
    March 2016

    Christy Mallory, Andrew Flores and Brad Sears head to Asheville, North Carolina, to the LGBT in the South Conference to discuss the Williams Institute’s research on LGBT demographics and discrimination in the Southern states. Thirty-five percent of the LGBT population in the United States lives in the South, where they are more likely to lack employment protections, earn less than $24,000 a year, and report that they cannot afford food or healthcare.

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    Estimates of Transgender Populations in States with Legislation Impacting Transgender People

    By Jody L. Herman, Christy Mallory, and Bianca D.M. Wilson

    Nearly 300,000 transgender youth and adults may be negatively impacted by legislation introduced in 15 states. These bills would limit access to single-sex restrooms and locker rooms at schools and in public places; limit protections based on gender identity; permit individuals and businesses to discriminate against transgender people based on religious and moral beliefs; and limit the ability to change certain vital records documents, such as birth certificates, or enforce the use of birth certificates to establish an individual’s sex for certain purposes. The report includes a brief description of each bill, which age groups it would affect, and how many transgender people we estimate live in each state.

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    Evidence of Discrimination in Public Accommodations Based on Sexual Orientation and Gender Identity: An Analysis of Complaints Filed with State Enforcement Agencies, 2008-2014

    By Christy Mallory and Brad Sears
    February 2016

    LGBT people file public accommodations discrimination complaints based on sexual orientation and gender identity as frequently as people of color and women file complaints based on race and sex. This study examines complaints filed with state enforcement agencies based on sexual orientation or gender identity, race, and sex and adjusted them by the number of adults most likely to experience each type of discrimination – LGBT people, people of color, and women.

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    Evidence of Housing Discrimination Based on Sexual Orientation and Gender Identity: An Analysis of Complaints Filed with State Enforcement Agencies, 2008-2014

    By Christy Mallory and Brad Sears
    February 2016

    LGBT people file housing discrimination complaints based on sexual orientation and gender identity as frequently as people of color and women file complaints based on race and sex. This study examines complaints filed with state enforcement agencies based on sexual orientation or gender identity, race, and sex and adjusts them by the number of adults most likely to experience each type of discrimination – LGBT people, people of color, and women. Data on discrimination complaints were collected from 18 of the 22 states that prohibited housing discrimination based on sexual orientation or gender identity.

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    Social Support Networks Among Diverse Sexual Minority Populations

    By David M. Frost, Ilan Meyer, and Sharon Schwartz
    February 2016

    Gay and bisexual men tend to rely on other gay and bisexual men for major needs, whereas heterosexuals, lesbians and bisexual women rely more on family, according to a new report published in the American Journal of Orthopsychiatry. The study differentiated between support for major needs – such as borrowing a large sum of money or help when one is sick – and everyday needs – such as small favors, social activities, help with small chores or discussing worries. For everyday needs, all groups relied more on others, like friends and coworkers, rather than family or their partners. LGB people relied primarily on other LGB people of the same race or ethnicity as themselves. Patterns were similar across all racial and ethnic groups.

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    Backlash, Consensus, Legitimacy, or Polarization: The Effect of Same-Sex Marriage Policy on Mass Attitudes

    By Andrew R. Flores and Scott Barclay
    January 2016

    In the last 10 years, public support for marriage for same-sex couples has increased across the United States. But the most dramatic drop in anti-gay attitudes occurred in states that legalized marriage equality – in fact, 47% of residents who initially were opposed changed their minds. That’s almost double the percentage seen in states where marriage equality was not legal. In those states, 24% of residents who were initially opposed changed their minds. The findings are discussed in a report co-authored by Public Opinion and Policy Analyst Andrew R. Flores and published in Political Research Quarterly.

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    The LGBT Divide in California: A Look at the Socioeconomic Well-being of LGBT People in California

    By Angeliki Kastanis
    January 2016

    While LGBT people in California appear to be doing better than LGBT people nationwide, there is as much disparity within the state as throughout the rest of the United States. This report and data interactive explores disparities in the socioeconomic well-being of LGBT people throughout California, using data from the 2010 U.S. Census and the 2012-2014 Gallup Daily Tracking Survey. These regional patterns mirror those for non-LGBT people, which suggests that broader demographic factors also play an important role in LGBT vulnerability.

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    Transgender inclusion in state non-discrimination policies: The democratic deficit and political powerlessness

    By Andrew Flores, Jody Herman and Christy Mallory
    December 2015

    We find that there is a substantial democratic deficit regarding the inclusion of gender identity or transgender in employment non-discrimination policies. On average, state support for the policy must be 81% in order for the state to have a policy reflecting such sentiment. This leaves substantial implications for the political powerlessness of transgender people in the political process.

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    The Price of Exclusion: A Research Guide

    By Andrew Park
    December 2015

    This research guide includes bibliographic references to research about the impact of discrimination against LGBT people, including poverty, lost productivity, homelessness, depression and suicide. The guide accompanies the United Nations video titled “The Price of Exclusion,” narrated by Zachery Quinto. The UN released the video to commemorate the anniversary of the signing of the United Nations Declaration on Human Rights. This guide provides references and summaries of the research underlying the data cited in the video, and also includes other selected research findings.

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    Internalized gay ageism, mattering, and depressive symptoms among midlife and older gay-identified men

    By Richard G. Wight, Allen J. LeBlanc, Ilan H. Meyer, Frederick A. Harig
    December 2015

    In this paper published in Social Science and Medicine we introduce the construct of “internalized gay ageism,” or the sense that one feels denigrated or depreciated because of aging in the context of a gay male identity, which we identify as an unexplored aspect of sexual minority stress specific to midlife and older gay-identified men. We find that internalized gay ageism can reliably be measured among these men, is positively associated with depressive symptoms net of an array of other factors that may also influence symptomatology (including depressive symptom histories), and mattering partially mediates but does not moderate its effect on depressive symptoms.

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    Employment Discrimination Based on Sexual Orientation and Gender Identity in North Dakota

    By Christy Mallory and Brad Sears
    December 2015

    Approximately 6,800 LGBT workers in North Dakota are not explicitly protected from discrimination under state or federal laws. Discrimination against LGBT employees has been documented in surveys, legislative testimony, the media, and in reports to community-based organizations. Many corporate employers and public opinion in Louisiana support protections for LGBT people in the workplace. If sexual orientation and gender identity were added to existing statewide non-discrimination laws, three more complaints would be filed in North Dakota each year. The cost of enforcing those complaints would most likely be negligible, and would not require additional court or administrative staff.

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    HIV Criminalization in California: Penal Implications for People Living with HIV/AIDS

    By Amira Hasenbush, Ayako Miyashita, and Bianca D.M. Wilson
    December 2015

    Given the lack of comprehensive data on the use of HIV criminal laws in California, Williams Institute researchers obtained criminal offender record information (CORI) data from the California Department of Justice. CORI data record any contacts an individual may have with the criminal justice system, from every event beginning at arrest through sentencing, so these data provide a full chronological record of how four state laws that criminalize people living with HIV are being utilized from the time of their enactment to June 2014.

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