Experts

  • MO-Census-Map

    Estimating the Economic Boost of Marriage for Same-Sex Couples in Missouri

    By Justin O'Neill, Christy Mallory, M.V. Lee Badgett
    September 2014

    Extending marriage to same-sex couples in Missouri would generate an estimated $36.3 million in spending to the state economy. According to the 2010 U.S. Census, the most recent data available, 10,557 same-sex couples live in Missouri. Of those couples, the Institute estimates that fifty percent (5,279couples) would choose to marry in the first three years, a pattern that has been observed in Massachusetts and elsewhere. The marriages that would occur in the first year alone would bring over $23.2 million in revenue to the state of Missouri that year.

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  • TX-img

    Same-Sex Couples in Texas: A demographic summary

    By Gary J. Gates
    September 2014

    Based on the Census 2010, there are 46,401 same-sex couples living in Texas. The majority of same-sex couples are female (52%). More than one in five same-sex couples in the state (23%) are raising children under age 18 in their homes. More than 10,860 same-sex-couple households in the state are raising nearly 18,700 children. Nearly one in three individuals in same-sex couples who are members of racial or ethnic minorities (31%) are raising a child under age 18, compared to 20% of their White counterparts. The median annual household income of same-sex couples with children under age 18 in the home is slightly lower than the median annual household income of comparable different-sex married couples ($73,005 versus $73,429).

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  • voter-id-laws-map

    The Potential Impact of Voter Identification Laws on Transgender Voters in the 2014 General Election

    By Jody L. Herman
    September 2014

    Ten states’ strict voter ID laws may create substantial barriers to voting and possible disenfranchisement for transgender voters in the November 2014 general election. Of the estimated 84,000 transgender people eligible to vote in these states, more than 24,000 individuals who have transitioned have no identification or record that accurately reflect their gender. Transgender people of color, youth, students, people with low incomes, and people with disabilities are likely overrepresented in this group.

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  • GA-Census-Map

    Estimating the Economic Boost of Marriage for Same-Sex Couples in Georgia

    By Justin O'Neill, Christy Mallory, M.V. Lee Badgett
    August 2014

    Extending marriage to same-sex couples in Georgia would generate an estimated $78.8 million in spending to the state economy. According to the 2010 U.S. Census, the most recent data available, 21,318 same-sex couples live in Georgia. Of those couples, the Institute estimates that fifty percent (10,659 couples) would choose to marry in the first three years, a pattern that has been observed in Massachusetts and elsewhere. The marriages that would occur in the first year alone would bring over $50.4 million in revenue to the state of Georgia that year.

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  • gallup-logo

    Healthcare Disadvantages and Discrepancies for LGBT Adults

    Gary J. Gates
    August 26, 2014

    LGBT adults are more likely than their non-LGBT counterparts to lack health insurance coverage. LGBT adults, particularly LGBT women, are more likely than non-LGBT individuals to report that they do not have a personal doctor. Among all adults, 29% of LGBT individuals did not have doctor compared to 21% of non-LGBT individuals. Among women, the gap was 29% for LGBT and 16% for non-LGBT. The differences in insurance coverage persist even when taking into account differences between LGBT and non-LGBT adults with regard to age, sex, race and ethnicity, educational attainment, state of residence, and population density.

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  • gallup-logo

    Financial, Social, and Emotional Challenges for LGBT Adults

    Gary J. Gates
    August 2014

    LGBT individuals, particularly LGBT women, are less likely to be thriving across a range of measures of their health and well-being. Nearly 4 in 10 non-LGBT adults (39%) indicated that they were thriving in their financial lives compared to less than 3 in 10 LGBT adults (29%). The difference represents the biggest gap between the proportion of LGBT and non-LGBT adults who indicated that they were thriving across multiple measures of well-being analyzed in this study. The gap among women was 12 percentage points compared to an 8 percentage point difference among men.

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  • australia-img

    Submission to the Australian Senate Legal and Constitutional Affairs Committee Regarding the Recognition of Foreign Marriages Bill 2014

    By M. V. Lee Badgett
    August 2014

    In her testimony submitted to the Australian Senate Legal and Constitutional Affairs Committee, Williams Distinguished Scholar M. V. Lee Badgett highlights three issues involving the likely impact of Recognition of the Foreign Marriages Bill 2014. Based on experiences in the United States and the Netherlands, allowing same-sex couples to marry has had positive effects on couples, their children, and their families. Data from both countries also shows that civil unions are not a good substitute for marriage.

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  • OK-Census-Map

    Estimating the Economic Boost of Marriage for Same-Sex Couples in Oklahoma

    By E.G. Fitzgerald, Christy Mallory, M.V. Lee Badgett
    August 2014

    Extending marriage to same-sex couples in Oklahoma would generate an estimated $20.5 million in spending to the state economy. According to the 2010 U.S. Census, the most recent data available, 6,134 same-sex couples live in Oklahoma. Of those couples, the Institute estimates that fifty percent (3,067 couples) would choose to marry in the first three years, a pattern that has been observed in Massachusetts and elsewhere. The marriages that would occur in the first year alone would bring over $13.1 million in revenue to the state of Oklahoma that year.

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  • FL-Census-Map

    Estimating the Economic Boost of Marriage for Same-Sex Couples in Florida

    By E.G. Fitzgerald, Christy Mallory, M.V. Lee Badgett
    August 2014

    Extending marriage to same-sex couples in Florida would generate an estimated $182.2 million in spending to the state economy. According to the 2010 U.S. Census, the most recent data available, 48,496 same-sex couples live in Florida. Of those couples, the Institute estimates that 50 percent (24,248 couples) would choose to marry in the first three years, a pattern that has been observed in Massachusetts and elsewhere. The marriages that would occur in the first year alone would bring over $116 million in revenue to the state of Florida that year.

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  • TN-Census-Map

    Estimating the Economic Boost of Marriage for Same-Sex Couples in Tennessee

    By Justin O'Neill, Christy Mallory, M.V. Lee Badgett
    August 2014

    Extending marriage to same-sex couples in Tennessee would generate an estimated $36.7 million in spending to the state economy. According to the 2010 U.S. Census, the most recent data available, 10,898 same-sex couples live in Tennessee. Of those couples, the Institute estimates that fifty percent (5,449 couples) would choose to marry in the first three years, a pattern that has been observed in Massachusetts and elsewhere. The marriages that would occur in the first year alone would bring over $23.5 million in revenue to the state of Tennessee that year.

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  • KY-Census-Map

    Estimating the Economic Boost of Marriage for Same-Sex Couples in Kentucky

    By Justin O'Neill, Christy Mallory, M.V. Lee Badgett
    August 2014

    Extending marriage to same-sex couples in Kentucky would generate an estimated $23.4 million in spending to the state economy. According to the 2010 U.S. Census, the most recent data available, 7,195 same-sex couples live in Kentucky. Of those couples, the Institute estimates that fifty percent (3,598 couples) would choose to marry in the first three years, a pattern that has been observed in Massachusetts and elsewhere. The marriages that would occur in the first year alone would bring over $15.0 million in revenue to the state of Kentucky that year.

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  • OH-Census-Map

    Estimating the Economic Boost of Marriage for Same-Sex Couples in Ohio

    By Justin O'Neill, Christy Mallory, M.V. Lee Badgett
    August 2014

    Extending marriage to same-sex couples in Ohio would generate an estimated $70.8 million in spending to the state economy. According to the 2010 U.S. Census, the most recent data available, 19,684 same-sex couples live in Ohio. Of those couples, the Institute estimates that fifty percent (9,842 couples) would choose to marry in the first three years, a pattern that has been observed in Massachusetts and elsewhere. The marriages that would occur in the first year alone would bring over $45.3 million in revenue to the state of Ohio that year.

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  • MI-Census-Map

    Estimating the Economic Boost of Marriage for Same-Sex Couples in Michigan

    By Justin O'Neill, Christy Mallory, M.V. Lee Badgett
    August 2014

    Extending marriage to same-sex couples in Michigan would generate an estimated $53.2 million in spending to the state economy. According to the 2010 U.S. Census, the most recent data available, 14,598 same-sex couples live in Michigan. Of those couples, the Institute estimates that fifty percent (7,299 couples) would choose to marry in the first three years, a pattern that has been observed in Massachusetts and elsewhere. The marriages that would occur in the first year alone would bring over $34.1 million in revenue to the state of Michigan that year.

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  • Family

    Research Report on LGB-Parent Families

    By Abbie E. Goldberg, Nanette K. Gartrell, Gary Gates
    July 2014

    LGB parenting has grown more visible over the past few decades. Research on LGB parents and their children has proliferated alongside this increasing visibility. This report addresses the research on LGB parenting, focusing on several main content areas: family building by LGB people, the transition to parenthood for LGB parents, and functioning and experiences of LGB parents and their children. In addition to discussing what we know about LGB-parent families, we identify gaps in our knowledge, and highlight key areas that future studies should aim to address.

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  • TX-img

    Estimating the Economic Boost of Marriage for Same-Sex Couples in Texas

    By E.G. Fitzgerald, Christy Mallory, M.V. Lee Badgett
    July 2014

    Extending marriage to same-sex couples in Texas would generate an estimated $181.6 million in spending to the state economy. According to the 2010 U.S. Census, the most recent data available, 46,401 same-sex couples live in Texas. Of those couples, the Institute estimates that 50 percent (23,200 couples) would choose to marry in the first three years. Over 14,848 marriages would occur in the first year alone, and bring up to $116 million in revenue to the state of Texas that year.

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  • youth-image

    Mental Health and Suicidality Among Racially/Ethnically Diverse Sexual Minority Youths

    By Wendy B. Bostwick, Ilan Meyer, et al.
    July 2014

    Sexual minority youth had higher prevalence than heterosexual youth of each of the six outcomes studied, including self-harm, feeling sad, and suicide ideation, planning, and attempts. The study shows that 22.8 percent of sexual minority youth compared with 6.6 percent of heterosexual youth had attempted suicide in the year prior to being surveyed. Notably, the odds of suicide ideation, planning, and attempt among sexual minority youth varied by race/ethnicity.

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  • Discrimination Against State and Local Government LGBT Employees: An Analysis of Administrative Complaints

    By Christy Mallory, Brad Sears
    July 2014

    Based on employment discrimination complaints with state and local administrative agencies, 589 complaints of sexual orientation and gender identity discrimination were filed by public sector workers in 123 jurisdictions. Discrimination against LGBT people in the public sector is pervasive and occurs nearly as frequently as discrimination in the private sector, at rates similar to discrimination based on sex and race. Currently, no federal law prohibits discrimination against LGBT people, and most states do not have laws prohibiting such discrimination.

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  • stress

    The Role of Help-Seeking in Preventing Suicide Attempts among Lesbians, Gay Men, and Bisexuals

    By Ilan Meyer, Merilee Teylan, Sharon Schwartz
    June 2014

    Lesbians, gay men and bisexuals (LGB) who sought help from religious or spiritual sources were more likely to commit suicide than those who sought treatment from a health care provider or who did not seek treatment at all. Only about 16 percent of LGB people who made a serious suicide attempt sought mental health treatment from a health professional prior to the attempt; about 13 percent sought religious or spiritual treatment prior to the attempt.

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  • NV-Census-Map

    Estimating the Economic Boost of Extending Marriage to Same-Sex Couples in Nevada

    By M.V. Lee Badgett, Christy Mallory
    June 2014

    Extending marriage to same-sex couples in Nevada would generate an additional $23 million to $53 million in spending to the state. According to 2010 U.S. Census, the state of Nevada has about 7,140 resident in same-sex relationships. Of those couples, 50 percent or 3,570 couples would chose to marry within the first 3 years, a pattern that has been witnessed in other states. As a result, about 2,300 marriages would occur in this first year alone; adding an additional $14 to $34 million in revenue to the state that year.

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  • AZ-Census-Map

    Estimating the Economic Boost of Marriage for Same-Sex Couples in Arizona

    By E.G. Fitzgerald, Christy Mallory, M.V. Lee Badgett
    June 2014

    Extending marriage to same-sex couples in Arizona would generate an estimated $61.9 million in spending to the state economy. This economic boost would add $5.1 million in sales tax revenue to the state coffer and spending related to same-sex couples’ wedding ceremonies and celebrations could generate up to 517 full- and part-time jobs in the state. According to 2010 U.S. Census data, 15,817 same-sex couples live in Arizona. Of those couples, an estimated 50 percent or 7,909 couples would choose to marry in the first three years.

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